American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

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American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

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  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

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Back to all reports


LEAHY, PATRICK, Democratic Party
Vermont

Total number of trips - 8
Total cost of trips - $31,313.08

Average cost per trip - $3,914.14
Total number of days spent traveling - 25 days
Rank of representative - 208 (Out of 638)


Individual trips


Sponsor(s) - Association of Trial Lawyers of America
Dates - January 21, 2000 - January 23, 2000 (3 days)
Location(s) - San Juan, Puerto Rico

Purpose - speech to the association
Notes - wife accompanied

Travel Cost - $1,093.00
Lodging Cost - $696.20
Meal Cost - $196.95
Other Cost - $35.00
Total Cost - $2,021.15

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Marine Corps Law Enforcement Foundation
Dates - June 3, 2000 - June 4, 2000 (2 days)
Location(s) - Atlantic City, NJ

Purpose - remarks at MCLEF annual banquette
Notes - Marcelle Leahy accompanied.

Travel Cost -
Lodging Cost - $125.00
Meal Cost - $350.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $475.00

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Marine Corps Law Enforcement Foundation
Dates - April 6, 2001 - April 7, 2001 (2 days)
Location(s) - New York, NY

Purpose - remarks at Marine Corps Law Enforcement Foundation banquet
Notes - Marcelle Leahy

Travel Cost -
Lodging Cost - $225.00
Meal Cost - $70.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $295.00

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Simons Foundation
Dates - November 30, 2001 - December 4, 2001 (5 days)
Location(s) - Vancouver, Canada

Purpose - Remarks and acceptance of The Simons Foundation award for peace and disarmament.
Notes - Marcelle Leahy

Travel Cost - $5,325.00
Lodging Cost - $197.73
Meal Cost - $72.60
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $5,595.33

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Consumer Electronics Association
Dates - January 8, 2002 - January 11, 2002 (4 days)
Location(s) - Las Vegas, NV

Purpose - Panel discussion hosted by the consumer electronic association at the consumer electronic show.
Notes - Marcell Leahy accompanied the Senator on this trip

Travel Cost - $2,022.00
Lodging Cost - $735.00
Meal Cost - $100.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $2,857.00

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Allen & Company
Dates - July 12, 2002 - July 14, 2002 (3 days)
Location(s) - Sun Valley, ID

Purpose - Discussion in the panel session on HIV/AIDS at the Allen & Company Annual Conference
Notes - Marcell Leahy accompanied the Senator on this trip

Travel Cost - $1,413.00
Lodging Cost - $1,009.00
Meal Cost - $395.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $2,817.00

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - McConnell Center for Political Leadership
Dates - March 2, 2003 - March 3, 2003 (2 days)
Location(s) - Louisville, KY

Purpose - Remarks to the "McConnell Scholars" as well as the general Louisville University community
Notes - Marcella Leahy accompanied

Travel Cost - $1,425.00
Lodging Cost - $135.60
Meal Cost - $189.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $1,749.60

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Center for Strategic & Intl Studies (CSIS)
Dates - November 11, 2004 - November 14, 2004 (4 days)
Location(s) - Paris, France

Purpose - US Participant in CSIS's high level dialogue entitled "The Future of the US-French Security Relationship" Marcelle accompanied the Senator on this trip.
Notes -

Travel Cost - $13,782.00
Lodging Cost - $821.00
Meal Cost - $900.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $15,503.00

Additional family members - Yes

American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

    Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.