American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

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WELDON, DAVE, Republican Party
Florida

Total number of trips - 12
Total cost of trips - $12,491.65

Average cost per trip - $1,040.97
Total number of days spent traveling - 30 days
Rank of representative - 399 (Out of 638)


Individual trips


Sponsor(s) - House Republican Study Committee
Dates - January 4, 2001 - January 5, 2001 (2 days)
Location(s) - Baltimore, MD

Purpose - educational
Notes -

Travel Cost - $44.00
Lodging Cost - $175.00
Meal Cost - $168.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $387.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Harvard University, Kennedy School of Government
Dates - January 11, 2001 - January 11, 2001 (1 days)
Location(s) - Key Largo, FL

Purpose - Speak to bipartisan congressional Health policy conference
Notes - Location of this trip was not disclosed. Other costs are for a fleece vest and tote bag.

Travel Cost - $679.50
Lodging Cost - $873.00
Meal Cost - $386.00
Other Cost - $44.95
Total Cost - $1,983.45

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Aspen Institute
Dates - March 9, 2001 - March 11, 2001 (3 days)
Location(s) - White Sulphur Springs, WV

Purpose - 2001 bipartisan congressional retreat
Notes - Location of this trip was not disclosed. Spouse Nancy Weldon and children Katie and David accompanied. Meal costs are included in lodging.

Travel Cost - $378.00
Lodging Cost - $1,530.00
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $1,908.00

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Canyonville Christian Academy
Dates - February 28, 2002 - March 2, 2002 (3 days)
Location(s) - Portland, OR

Purpose - invitation to speak at seminar on government at daughter's Boarding School
Notes - spouse Nancy Weldon accompanied, other expenses are for rental car

Travel Cost - $686.00
Lodging Cost - $267.00
Meal Cost -
Other Cost - $340.93
Total Cost - $1,293.93

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Public Governance Institute
Dates - February 28, 2003 - March 2, 2003 (3 days)
Location(s) - White Sulphur Springs, WV

Purpose - discussion of issues and agenda
Notes - with spouse Nancy - lodging covers meals

Travel Cost - $350.00
Lodging Cost - $1,035.00
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $1,385.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Mercatus Center
Dates - February 21, 2003 - February 23, 2003 (3 days)
Location(s) - Not specified

Purpose - education on congressional issues
Notes - with spouse Joy Gartzke - no location listed

Travel Cost - $160.00
Lodging Cost - $270.00
Meal Cost - $360.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $790.00

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Autism One
Dates - May 28, 2004 - May 29, 2004 (2 days)
Location(s) - Chicago, IL

Purpose - Speech at convention
Notes - Washington, DC - Chicago, IL - Washington, DC

Travel Cost - $435.20
Lodging Cost - $170.00
Meal Cost - $50.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $655.20

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Texas Right to Life
Dates - April 19, 2004 - April 20, 2004 (2 days)
Location(s) - Austin, TX

Purpose - Speech to members of the Texas legislator
Notes - Washington, DC - Austin, TX - Washington, DC

Travel Cost - $353.95
Lodging Cost - $60.00
Meal Cost - $40.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $453.95

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Montel Williams Show
Dates - March 22, 2005 - March 23, 2005 (2 days)
Location(s) - New York, NY

Purpose - Purpose was to discuss the autism health issue, which Congressman Weldon has introduced legislation on
Notes - Orlando - New York, NY - Orlando

Travel Cost - $708.10
Lodging Cost - $185.00
Meal Cost - $50.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $943.10

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Heritage Foundation
Dates - February 3, 2005 - February 5, 2005 (3 days)
Location(s) - Baltimore, MD

Purpose - Conservative Members Retreat
Notes - Member: DC - Baltimore - Orlando Spouse: Orlando - Baltimore - Orlando

Travel Cost - $113.40
Lodging Cost - $425.26
Meal Cost - $455.05
Other Cost - $39.41
Total Cost - $1,033.12

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Congressional Institute
Dates - January 7, 2005 - January 9, 2005 (3 days)
Location(s) - Scottsdale, AZ

Purpose - 104th Congress Class Retreat
Notes - Orlando - Arizona - Orlando [assumed city]

Travel Cost -
Lodging Cost - $504.00
Meal Cost - $567.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $1,071.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - ABC News
Dates - March 26, 2005 - March 28, 2005 (3 days)
Location(s) - Washington, DC

Purpose - The purpose of the trip was to appear on "This Week with George Stephanopoulos."
Notes - Orlando, FL - Washington, DC - Orlando, FL

Travel Cost - $587.90
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $587.90

Additional family members - No

American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.