American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

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SHAW, CLAY, Republican Party
Florida

Total number of trips - 14
Total cost of trips - $26,082.54

Average cost per trip - $1,863.04
Total number of days spent traveling - 76 days
Rank of representative - 247 (Out of 638)


Individual trips


Sponsor(s) - Ripon Educational Fund
Dates - November 24, 2000 - December 1, 2000 (8 days)
Location(s) - Rome, Italy

Purpose - Fact-finding and to speak on trade implications of social policy pension reform
Notes - Accompanied by spouse Emilie Shaw; loding and meal expenses not actually listed

Travel Cost - $5,894.00
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $5,894.00

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Consumer Electronics Association, Large Public Power Council
Dates - January 6, 2000 - January 9, 2000 (4 days)
Location(s) - Las Vegas, NV

Purpose - Fact-finding mission re: tax
Notes - Accompanied by spouse Emilie C. Shaw - no actual expenses listed on the sheet. Las Vegas, NV - Carefree, AZ

Travel Cost -
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost -

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - WILD Foundation
Dates - July 1, 2000 - July 10, 2000 (10 days)
Location(s) - Tzaneen, South Africa - Johannesburg, South Africa - Windoek, Namibia

Purpose - Fact-finding mission to include environment, natural resource priorities and foreign policy
Notes - Accompanied by spouse Emilie C. Shaw - no actual expenses listed on the sheet

Travel Cost -
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost -

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Chicago Board of Trade, Chicago Mercantile Exchange
Dates - March 16, 2002 - March 16, 2002 (1 days)
Location(s) - Boca Raton, FL

Purpose - participate in Futures Industry Association's conference
Notes - Spouse Emilie C. Shaw accompanied.

Travel Cost -
Lodging Cost - $510.82
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $510.82

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Ripon Educational Fund
Dates - August 10, 2001 - August 17, 2001 (8 days)
Location(s) - Edinburgh, Scotland

Purpose - meetings with business and govt. leaders on public policy issues that affect US - Scotland relations
Notes - spouse Emilie Shaw - other costs not specified.

Travel Cost - $1,908.00
Lodging Cost - $1,971.00
Meal Cost - $1,136.00
Other Cost - $90.00
Total Cost - $5,105.00

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Aspen Institute
Dates - March 9, 2001 - March 11, 2001 (3 days)
Location(s) - White Sulphur Springs, WV

Purpose - bipartisan congressional retreat
Notes - spouse Emilie - Grandchildren Keeley clay and Ashton Wilder Grand. Meals included in lodging cost.

Travel Cost - $504.00
Lodging Cost - $950.00
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $1,454.00

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Center for Strategic and International Studies
Dates - January 22, 2001 - January 26, 2001 (5 days)
Location(s) - Zurich, Switzerland

Purpose - head of American delegation to the Commission on Global Aging's 2nd Plenary meeting
Notes - spouse Emilie Shaw. No figures given for expenses.

Travel Cost -
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost -

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Congressional Sportsmen's Foundation
Dates - March 20, 2004 - March 21, 2004 (2 days)
Location(s) - Duck Key, FL

Purpose - to bring leaders from outdoor industry and conservation organizations together to discuss issues facing America's sporting traditions
Notes - Exact numbers not filled in - with spouse Emilie Shaw. [Personal financial disclosure statement showed location]

Travel Cost -
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost -

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Republican Main Street Partnership
Dates - June 21, 2003 - June 22, 2003 (2 days)
Location(s) - New York, NY

Purpose - conference to share ideas
Notes - spouse, Emilie Shaw, other costs not specified

Travel Cost - $609.00
Lodging Cost - $300.00
Meal Cost - $600.00
Other Cost - $200.00
Total Cost - $1,709.00

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Transatlantic Policy Network
Dates - April 11, 2003 - April 15, 2003 (5 days)
Location(s) - Paris, France - Malaga, Spain

Purpose - discuss transatlantic relations and promote transatlantic partner through member (of Congress) to Member (of European parliament) dialogue.
Notes - spouse, Emilie Shaw accompanied. No actual figures for expenses disclosed.

Travel Cost -
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost -

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Ripon Educational Fund
Dates - August 10, 2003 - August 15, 2003 (6 days)
Location(s) - Shannon, Ireland - London, England - Fort Lauderdale, FL

Purpose - to meet with government and business leaders to discuss public policy issues that affect relations between U.S. & Great Britain.m. Also to meet with British secretary for labor & pensions to discuss social security.
Notes - spouse, Emilie Shaw accompanied. [Amended report to remove Kessler & Associats as sponsor. Also to reduce amount]

Travel Cost - $3,470.60
Lodging Cost - $1,218.00
Meal Cost - $1,256.28
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $5,944.88

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Clark Consulting
Dates - October 24, 2003 - October 26, 2003 (3 days)
Location(s) - Naples, FL

Purpose - guest speaker at 2003 client retreat-re:ways & means committee business
Notes - spouse, Emilie Shaw accompanied. No actual figures for expenses disclosed.

Travel Cost -
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost -

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - African Wildlife Foundation
Dates - June 26, 2004 - July 6, 2004 (11 days)
Location(s) - Tanzania

Purpose - Study of conservation in Tan
Notes - DC - Tanzania - DC Rep did not include any dollar amounts for expenses

Travel Cost -
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost -

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Century Business Services Inc
Dates - August 3, 2003 - August 10, 2003 (8 days)
Location(s) - Shannon, Ireland - London, England

Purpose - International trade symposium
Notes - Washington, DC - Shannon, Ireland - London, England Including spouse Personal expense: 8/8 - 8/10

Travel Cost - $2,934.84
Lodging Cost - $1,610.00
Meal Cost - $920.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $5,464.84

Additional family members - Yes

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.