American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

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ROSS, MICHAEL A, Democratic Party
Arkansas

Total number of trips - 10
Total cost of trips - $48,876.69

Average cost per trip - $4,887.67
Total number of days spent traveling - 32 days
Rank of representative - 128 (Out of 638)


Individual trips


Sponsor(s) - U.S. Association of Former Members of Congress
Dates - April 12, 2003 - April 17, 2003 (6 days)
Location(s) - Berlin, Germany - Heidelberg, Germany

Purpose - to attend 20th Annual congress-Budentag seminar
Notes - spouse, Holiday Ross

Travel Cost - $5,665.64
Lodging Cost - $900.00
Meal Cost - $600.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $7,165.64

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Community Financial Services Association of America
Dates - June 27, 2003 - June 29, 2003 (3 days)
Location(s) - Jackson Hole, WY

Purpose - Forum on payday advance industry issues
Notes - other-none disclosed

Travel Cost - $968.00
Lodging Cost - $1,000.00
Meal Cost - $125.00
Other Cost - $25.00
Total Cost - $2,118.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - American Association for Homecare
Dates - October 8, 2003 - October 9, 2003 (2 days)
Location(s) - Atlanta, GA

Purpose - discuss Medicare reform with members of the association
Notes -

Travel Cost - $1,888.49
Lodging Cost - $229.14
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $2,117.63

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - NASDAQ
Dates - March 13, 2003 - March 13, 2003 (1 days)
Location(s) - New York, NY

Purpose - learn about securities market issues
Notes -

Travel Cost - $937.49
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $937.49

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Chicago Mercantile Exchange
Dates - October 6, 2003 - October 7, 2003 (2 days)
Location(s) - Chicago, IL

Purpose - fact-finding trip to better understand the financial markets for the AgCmte. General Commodities to Risk Management sub culture jurisdiction. Overview of recent innovations and efforts to increase global industry
Notes -

Travel Cost - $1,296.27
Lodging Cost - $194.18
Meal Cost - $176.73
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $1,667.18

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - I-49 International Coalition
Dates - October 23, 2003 - October 24, 2003 (2 days)
Location(s) - Kansas City, MO - Joplin, MO - Fort Smith, AR - Shreveport, LA - Doddridge, AR - Lafayette, LA - New Orleans, LA

Purpose - for member of congress and their staffs to view the I-49 route from Kansas City, MO to the Port of New Orleans and to create dialog and awareness through public meetings with Members of Congress and the I-49 International Coalition.
Notes -

Travel Cost - $965.72
Lodging Cost - $185.00
Meal Cost - $110.39
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $1,261.11

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - New York Stock Exchange
Dates - January 29, 2004 - January 30, 2004 (2 days)
Location(s) - New York, NY

Purpose - Establish and improve relations between members of the Committee on financial services and the New York Stock Exchange
Notes - with spouse Holly

Travel Cost - $2,717.88
Lodging Cost - $310.63
Meal Cost - $410.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $3,438.51

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - New York Stock Exchange
Dates - June 2, 2003 - June 3, 2003 (2 days)
Location(s) - New York, NY

Purpose - To discuss issues affecting capital markets and the investor community.
Notes - Child Sydney Beth Ross accompanied.

Travel Cost - $589.93
Lodging Cost - $397.20
Meal Cost - $21.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $1,008.13

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - American Australian Assn, Australian Govt
Dates - November 6, 2004 - November 14, 2004 (9 days)
Location(s) - Sydney, Australia

Purpose - To discuss issues of common interest between the two countries, including but not limited to the Australian Free Trade Agreement
Notes - Little Rock, AR - Sydney, Australia - Little Rock, AR

Travel Cost - $25,163.50
Lodging Cost - $1,997.70
Meal Cost - $651.84
Other Cost - $423.08
Total Cost - $28,236.12

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - HME News, United Publications
Dates - September 11, 2005 - September 13, 2005 (3 days)
Location(s) - Chicago, IL

Purpose - Attend and speak at the annual conference
Notes - Little Rock, AR - Chicago, IL - Washington, DC Including spouse

Travel Cost - $479.90
Lodging Cost - $446.98
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $926.88

Additional family members - Yes

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.