American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

Back to all reports


POMEROY, EARL RALPH, Democratic Party
North Dakota

Total number of trips - 12
Total cost of trips - $45,003.92

Average cost per trip - $3,750.33
Total number of days spent traveling - 52 days
Rank of representative - 141 (Out of 638)


Individual trips


Sponsor(s) - Morgan Stanley Dean Witter
Dates - June 5, 2000 - June 6, 2000 (2 days)
Location(s) - New York, NY

Purpose - Speech to MSDW Global Pensions Group
Notes -

Travel Cost - $235.20
Lodging Cost - $272.67
Meal Cost - $66.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $573.87

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - National Farmers Union
Dates - February 25, 2000 - February 26, 2000 (2 days)
Location(s) - Salt Lake City, UT

Purpose - Speech to the National Farmers Union Convention
Notes -

Travel Cost - $601.00
Lodging Cost - $125.00
Meal Cost - $18.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $744.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Pacific Life Insurance Co., Wellpoint Health Networks
Dates - May 31, 2000 - June 1, 2000 (2 days)
Location(s) - Thousand Oaks, CA - Newport Beach, CA

Purpose - Breakfast speech to Pacific Life; lunch speech to Wellpoint
Notes -

Travel Cost - $1,421.25
Lodging Cost - $172.92
Meal Cost - $32.50
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $1,626.67

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Aspen Institute
Dates - January 28, 2000 - January 29, 2000 (2 days)
Location(s) - Queenstown, MD

Purpose - Participate in Agriculture Committee Retreat
Notes -

Travel Cost -
Lodging Cost - $140.00
Meal Cost - $125.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $265.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Passe Club International
Dates - December 4, 2000 - December 4, 2000 (1 days)
Location(s) - Not specified

Purpose - Speech to National Association of Insurance Commissioners
Notes - No location listed

Travel Cost - $544.00
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost - $18.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $562.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Save the Children, OXFAM, Academy for Educational Development
Dates - January 21, 2001 - January 28, 2001 (8 days)
Location(s) - Mali - Ghana

Purpose - Educational
Notes - Other expenses for incidentals

Travel Cost - $5,008.50
Lodging Cost - $465.56
Meal Cost - $181.58
Other Cost - $31.96
Total Cost - $5,687.60

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Center for Strategic and International Studies, Japan External Trade Organization
Dates - August 24, 2001 - August 30, 2001 (7 days)
Location(s) - Tokyo, Japan

Purpose - Keynote address as Global Aging Initiative Commission Member
Notes -

Travel Cost - $6,746.25
Lodging Cost - $995.69
Meal Cost - $520.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $8,261.94

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Better Hong Kong Foundation, Chinese International Economic Cooperation Association, Korea-US Exchange Council
Dates - February 14, 2003 - February 22, 2003 (9 days)
Location(s) - Hong Kong - Taiwan - South Korea

Purpose - increase knowledge of security, trade, political environments in region
Notes -

Travel Cost - $9,688.30
Lodging Cost - $1,750.00
Meal Cost - $400.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $11,838.30

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - National Council on Compensation Insurance
Dates - May 6, 2004 - May 7, 2004 (2 days)
Location(s) - Orlando, FL

Purpose - Keynote speech at NCCI's Annual Symposium
Notes -

Travel Cost - $1,334.70
Lodging Cost - $235.00
Meal Cost - $119.19
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $1,688.89

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - US Malaysia Exchange Assn
Dates - February 18, 2005 - February 25, 2005 (8 days)
Location(s) - Malaysia

Purpose - This trip was designed to strengthen the bilateral relationship between the US and Malaysia as long-time allies and key trading partners. The complete list of meeting is attached.
Notes - Washington, DC - Korea - Malaysia - Bismarck, ND

Travel Cost - $5,297.92
Lodging Cost - $363.00
Meal Cost - $126.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $5,786.92

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Korea-US Exchange Council
Dates - February 18, 2005 - February 25, 2005 (8 days)
Location(s) - South Korea

Purpose - This trip designed to strength the bilateral relationship between the US and the Republic of Korea as long-time allies and key trading partners. The complete list of meetings held is attached.
Notes - Washington, DC - Korea - Malaysia - Bismarck, ND

Travel Cost - $5,378.92
Lodging Cost - $1,200.00
Meal Cost - $410.00
Other Cost - $90.00
Total Cost - $7,078.92

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Americans United to Protect Social Security
Dates - March 24, 2005 - March 24, 2005 (1 days)
Location(s) - Rochester, MN

Purpose - Discuss Social Security
Notes - Fargo, ND - Rochester, MN - Bismarck, ND

Travel Cost - $881.81
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost - $8.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $889.81

Additional family members - No

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.