American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

Back to all reports


MORAN, JAMES P JR, Democratic Party
Virginia

Total number of trips - 18
Total cost of trips - $43,531.49

Average cost per trip - $2,418.42
Total number of days spent traveling - 68 days
Rank of representative - 150 (Out of 638)


Individual trips


Sponsor(s) - Democratic Leadership Council
Dates - July 14, 2000 - July 16, 2000 (3 days)
Location(s) - Baltimore, MD

Purpose - DLC - National Conversation
Notes - Took children Mary Elise, Patrick, Dorothy, and Grayson

Travel Cost - $9.00
Lodging Cost - $335.00
Meal Cost - $100.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $444.00

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Democratic Leadership Council
Dates - May 21, 2000 - May 22, 2000 (2 days)
Location(s) - Hyde Park, NY

Purpose - Attend conference
Notes -

Travel Cost - $225.00
Lodging Cost - $82.00
Meal Cost - $84.00
Other Cost - $13.00
Total Cost - $404.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Center for Middle East Peace and Economic Cooperation
Dates - April 17, 2000 - April 23, 2000 (7 days)
Location(s) - Morocco - Tunisia - Algeria - Egypt

Purpose - Fact-finding
Notes -

Travel Cost - $6,344.00
Lodging Cost - $602.00
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $6,946.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Democratic Leadership Council
Dates - April 28, 2000 - April 30, 2000 (3 days)
Location(s) - New Orleans, LA

Purpose - Spring retreat
Notes -

Travel Cost - $280.00
Lodging Cost - $396.00
Meal Cost - $143.00
Other Cost - $37.60
Total Cost - $856.60

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - American International Group
Dates - April 10, 2000 - April 10, 2000 (1 days)
Location(s) - New York, NY

Purpose - Speaking engagement
Notes -

Travel Cost - $450.00
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost - $25.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $475.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Progressive Policy Institute
Dates - July 6, 2000 - July 10, 2000 (5 days)
Location(s) - Santiago, Chile

Purpose - Conference "Progressive Politics in the Americas"
Notes -

Travel Cost - $4,000.00
Lodging Cost - $615.00
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $4,615.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Democratic Leadership Council
Dates - March 31, 2001 - April 3, 2001 (4 days)
Location(s) - Boston, MA

Purpose - DLC conference
Notes - son Patrick accompanied

Travel Cost - $375.00
Lodging Cost - $200.00
Meal Cost - $75.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $650.00

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Techissues.net, Key3media
Dates - April 1, 2001 - April 2, 2001 (2 days)
Location(s) - Chicago, IL

Purpose - speaker at a technology public policy privacy panel.
Notes -

Travel Cost - $1,814.00
Lodging Cost - $225.00
Meal Cost - $44.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $2,083.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - World Economic Forum
Dates - January 25, 2001 - January 29, 2001 (5 days)
Location(s) - Davos, Switzerland

Purpose - to discuss the future of NATO
Notes -

Travel Cost - $2,600.00
Lodging Cost - $750.00
Meal Cost - $300.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $3,650.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Democratic Leadership Council
Dates - May 11, 2001 - May 13, 2001 (3 days)
Location(s) - Key Largo, FL

Purpose - DLC conference
Notes - other expenses not specified

Travel Cost - $982.00
Lodging Cost - $674.00
Meal Cost - $226.00
Other Cost - $170.00
Total Cost - $2,052.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - National Chamber Foundation, U.S. Chamber of Commerce
Dates - July 20, 2001 - July 21, 2001 (2 days)
Location(s) - Leesburg, VA

Purpose - Annual Privacy Retreat
Notes -

Travel Cost -
Lodging Cost - $400.00
Meal Cost - $175.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $575.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Center for Middle East Peace and Economic Cooperation
Dates - February 17, 2001 - February 23, 2001 (7 days)
Location(s) - Middle East

Purpose - fact finding
Notes - other costs are for exit visas

Travel Cost - $6,445.19
Lodging Cost - $1,302.15
Meal Cost - $100.00
Other Cost - $30.75
Total Cost - $7,878.09

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Transatlantic Policy Network
Dates - April 6, 2001 - April 11, 2001 (6 days)
Location(s) - Spain

Purpose - annual spring meeting to discuss trade, security and internet issues and US - EU partnership in current administration
Notes -

Travel Cost - $3,435.00
Lodging Cost - $572.00
Meal Cost - $292.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $4,299.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Aspen Institute
Dates - March 9, 2001 - March 11, 2001 (3 days)
Location(s) - White Sulphur Springs, WV

Purpose - 2001 Bipartisan Congressional Retreat
Notes - Children Patrick and Dorothy accompanied. They shared a room. Lodging costs include Rep. Moran's meals. Other costs are not specified.

Travel Cost - $378.00
Lodging Cost - $660.00
Meal Cost - $580.00
Other Cost - $140.00
Total Cost - $1,758.00

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Harvard University, Kennedy School of Government
Dates - February 7, 2002 - February 8, 2002 (2 days)
Location(s) - Cambridge, MA

Purpose - meeting to discuss "the future of public service."
Notes -

Travel Cost - $405.50
Lodging Cost - $178.81
Meal Cost - $25.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $609.31

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Democratic Leadership Council
Dates - April 25, 2002 - April 28, 2002 (4 days)
Location(s) - New Orleans, LA

Purpose - educational
Notes - Other costs not specified.

Travel Cost - $552.20
Lodging Cost - $829.20
Meal Cost - $244.25
Other Cost - $45.34
Total Cost - $1,670.99

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Istanbul Textile and Apparel Exporters Associations
Dates - February 16, 2002 - February 20, 2002 (5 days)
Location(s) - Istanbul, Turkey

Purpose - inaugural visit by Turkish Caucus
Notes - Other costs not specified.

Travel Cost - $4,049.50
Lodging Cost - $360.00
Meal Cost - $84.00
Other Cost - $72.00
Total Cost - $4,565.50

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Democratic Leadership Conference
Dates - March 25, 2004 - March 28, 2004 (4 days)
Location(s) - Amelia Island, FL

Purpose - not specified
Notes - Washington, DC - Amelia Is., FL - Washington, DC This information is from a House of Representatives personal financial disclosure report and does not include dollar amounts.

Travel Cost -
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost -

Additional family members - Yes

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.