American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

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GRANGER, KAY N, Republican Party
Texas

Total number of trips - 8
Total cost of trips - $31,536.75

Average cost per trip - $3,942.09
Total number of days spent traveling - 33 days
Rank of representative - 206 (Out of 638)


Individual trips


Sponsor(s) - Association of American Railroads, Burlington Northern & Sante Fe
Dates - January 21, 2000 - January 23, 2000 (3 days)
Location(s) - Palm Springs, CA

Purpose - Speech at their annual legislative conference
Notes -

Travel Cost - $1,434.00
Lodging Cost - $800.00
Meal Cost - $300.00
Other Cost - $170.00
Total Cost - $2,704.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Ripon Educational Fund
Dates - November 25, 2000 - December 2, 2000 (8 days)
Location(s) - Rome, Italy

Purpose - ????
Notes - No purpose stated

Travel Cost - $3,150.00
Lodging Cost - $1,750.00
Meal Cost - $500.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $5,400.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Heritage Foundation
Dates - August 8, 2001 - August 11, 2001 (4 days)
Location(s) - Colorado Springs, CO

Purpose - Educational conference
Notes - Other costs not specified

Travel Cost - $373.00
Lodging Cost - $1,043.16
Meal Cost - $302.66
Other Cost - $157.68
Total Cost - $1,876.50

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Istanbul Textile and Apparel Exporters Associations
Dates - February 14, 2002 - February 22, 2002 (9 days)
Location(s) - Istanbul, Turkey

Purpose - inaugural visit by Turkish Caucus
Notes - John Dean Granger accompanied.

Travel Cost - $13,005.00
Lodging Cost - $960.00
Meal Cost - $402.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $14,367.00

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Radio Shack
Dates - October 24, 2003 - October 26, 2003 (3 days)
Location(s) - Vancouver, Canada

Purpose - To view, and do fact finding, on a community development project in Vancouver that is similar to a developing project in Fort Worth
Notes - Radio Shack paid for the airfare - member personally covered other expenses.

Travel Cost - $2,680.25
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $2,680.25

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Burlington Northern Santa Fe
Dates - February 18, 2005 - February 20, 2005 (3 days)
Location(s) - Orlando, FL - Scottsdale, AZ

Purpose - Attend Association of American Railroads Legislative Conference and NRCC Retreat
Notes - Ft Worth - Orlando - Scottsdale - Ft Worth $550 Lodging & Registration Paid by Campaign

Travel Cost - $2,697.00
Lodging Cost - $461.00
Meal Cost - $170.00
Other Cost - $550.00
Total Cost - $3,878.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Burlington Northern Santa Fe
Dates - February 18, 2005 - February 19, 2005 (2 days)
Location(s) - Orlando, FL

Purpose - Attend Association of American Railroads Legislative Conference
Notes - Ft Worth - Orlando - Ft Worth

Travel Cost -
Lodging Cost - $461.00
Meal Cost - $170.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $631.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Lockheed
Dates - July 8, 2004 - July 8, 2004 (1 days)
Location(s) - Washington, DC

Purpose - not specified
Notes - Fort Worth - DC This information is from a House of Representatives personal financial disclosure report and does not include dollar amounts.

Travel Cost -
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost -

Additional family members - No

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.