American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

Back to all reports


GRAHAM, LINDSEY OLIN, Republican Party
South Carolina

Total number of trips - 12
Total cost of trips - $22,261.19

Average cost per trip - $1,855.10
Total number of days spent traveling - 34 days
Rank of representative - 280 (Out of 638)


Individual trips


Sponsor(s) - Quail Unlimited
Dates - February 1, 2003 - February 2, 2003 (2 days)
Location(s) - Albany, GA

Purpose - speaking engagement
Notes -

Travel Cost - $789.00
Lodging Cost - $330.00
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $1,119.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Motion Picture Association of America
Dates - February 18, 2003 - February 20, 2003 (3 days)
Location(s) - Los Angeles, CA

Purpose - copyright management systems briefing
Notes -

Travel Cost - $290.05
Lodging Cost - $460.72
Meal Cost - $88.98
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $839.75

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - NBC - Meet the Press
Dates - March 1, 2003 - March 1, 2003 (1 days)
Location(s) - Washington, DC

Purpose - speaking engagement
Notes - Colombia, SC - Dulles

Travel Cost - $601.50
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $601.50

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Business Roundtable
Dates - May 1, 2003 - May 2, 2003 (2 days)
Location(s) - New York, NY

Purpose - speaking engagement
Notes -

Travel Cost - $268.00
Lodging Cost - $353.94
Meal Cost - $115.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $736.94

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - ABC News
Dates - May 3, 2003 - May 3, 2003 (1 days)
Location(s) - New York, NY - Columbia, SC

Purpose - speaking engagement
Notes -

Travel Cost - $708.00
Lodging Cost - $120.00
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $828.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Pathology Service Associates
Dates - July 18, 2003 - July 22, 2003 (5 days)
Location(s) - Orlando, FL

Purpose - speaking engagement
Notes -

Travel Cost - $543.00
Lodging Cost - $500.00
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $1,043.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Nuclear Energy Institute
Dates - August 2, 2003 - August 7, 2003 (6 days)
Location(s) - Rome, Italy

Purpose - Fact-finding trip to nuclear facilities
Notes -

Travel Cost - $7,959.00
Lodging Cost - $1,244.00
Meal Cost - $1,435.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $10,638.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Corning Inc.
Dates - March 8, 2002 - March 10, 2002 (3 days)
Location(s) - Augusta, GA

Purpose - Corning Public Policy conference
Notes -

Travel Cost -
Lodging Cost - $410.00
Meal Cost - $165.00
Other Cost - $266.00
Total Cost - $841.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - South Carolina Manufacturing Alliance
Dates - May 17, 2002 - May 17, 2002 (1 days)
Location(s) - Sea Island, GA

Purpose - policy briefing and speech to annual meeting of SC Manufacturing Alliance.
Notes -

Travel Cost - $669.00
Lodging Cost - $402.00
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $1,071.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - American Trial Lawyers Assn
Dates - January 30, 2005 - January 30, 2005 (1 days)
Location(s) - La Quinta, CA

Purpose - Keynote speaker, American Trial Lawyers Association 2005 Winter Convention
Notes -

Travel Cost -
Lodging Cost - $260.00
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $260.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Sony Pictures Entertainment
Dates - January 10, 2005 - January 16, 2005 (7 days)
Location(s) - Honolulu, HI

Purpose - Keynote, Sony Open Forum 2005 "Era of Convergence: Re-examining its Threats and Opportunities"
Notes -

Travel Cost - $2,443.00
Lodging Cost - $1,350.00
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $3,793.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Southeast American Board of Trial Advocates (ABOTA)
Dates - April 7, 2005 - April 8, 2005 (2 days)
Location(s) - New Orleans, LA

Purpose - Keynote speaker, Southeast ABOTA National Convention
Notes -

Travel Cost - $295.00
Lodging Cost - $195.00
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $490.00

Additional family members - No

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.