American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

Back to all reports


DAVIS, SUSAN, Democratic Party
California

Total number of trips - 9
Total cost of trips - $29,727.20

Average cost per trip - $3,303.02
Total number of days spent traveling - 37 days
Rank of representative - 222 (Out of 638)


Individual trips


Sponsor(s) - Aspen Institute
Dates - March 9, 2001 - March 11, 2001 (3 days)
Location(s) - White Sulphur Springs, WV

Purpose - Bipartisan Congressional Conference
Notes - Spouse Dr Steven J Davis accompanied. Other costs are for registration fee. Meals included in lodging cost

Travel Cost - $252.00
Lodging Cost - $950.00
Meal Cost -
Other Cost - $150.00
Total Cost - $1,352.00

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - California Council for International Trade
Dates - January 10, 2001 - January 12, 2001 (3 days)
Location(s) - Monterey, CA

Purpose - Gave remarks and presided over panel at Monterey Congressional Forum
Notes -

Travel Cost - $1,058.50
Lodging Cost - $150.00
Meal Cost - $85.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $1,293.50

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Public Governance Institute
Dates - February 28, 2003 - March 2, 2003 (3 days)
Location(s) - White Sulphur Springs, WV

Purpose - Congressional Retreat 2003
Notes - Spouse Dr Steve Davis accompanied. Meals included in lodging cost.

Travel Cost -
Lodging Cost - $1,035.00
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $1,035.00

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - California Council for International Trade
Dates - January 10, 2003 - January 12, 2003 (3 days)
Location(s) - Monterey, CA

Purpose - Part of legislative panel
Notes -

Travel Cost - $942.00
Lodging Cost - $183.00
Meal Cost - $125.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $1,250.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - American Israel Education Foundation
Dates - August 2, 2003 - August 10, 2003 (9 days)
Location(s) - Tel Aviv, Israel - Jerusalem, Israel

Purpose - Education mission
Notes - Spouse Dr Steve Davis accompanied. Other costs are for registration and transportation

Travel Cost - $7,308.00
Lodging Cost - $2,571.40
Meal Cost - $754.50
Other Cost - $817.40
Total Cost - $11,451.30

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Annenberg Foundation Trust at Sunnylands
Dates - December 5, 2003 - December 7, 2003 (3 days)
Location(s) - Westin Mission Hills, CA

Purpose - Bipartisan legislative planning session
Notes - Dr. Steve Davis, spouse-lodging costs n/a-other cost group activities

Travel Cost - $243.36
Lodging Cost - $399.96
Meal Cost - $716.86
Other Cost - $40.74
Total Cost - $1,400.92

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Faith & Politics Institute
Dates - March 4, 2005 - March 6, 2005 (3 days)
Location(s) - Selma, AL

Purpose - Congressional Civil Rights Pilgrimage
Notes - Washington, DC - Selma, AL - Washington, DC

Travel Cost - $465.00
Lodging Cost - $268.00
Meal Cost - $130.00
Other Cost - $62.00
Total Cost - $925.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Democratic Leadership Council
Dates - April 28, 2005 - May 1, 2005 (4 days)
Location(s) - New Orleans, LA

Purpose - Democratic Leadership Council spring retreat
Notes - Washington, DC - New Orleans, LA - Washington, DC Including spouse

Travel Cost - $1,546.11
Lodging Cost - $566.74
Meal Cost - $160.63
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $2,273.48

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Aspen Institute
Dates - August 21, 2005 - August 26, 2005 (6 days)
Location(s) - Dublin, Ireland

Purpose - To participate in a conference on US-Russia-Europe relations
Notes - San Diego - Dublin, Ireland - Washington, DC Including spouse

Travel Cost - $5,584.00
Lodging Cost - $1,562.00
Meal Cost - $1,400.00
Other Cost - $200.00
Total Cost - $8,746.00

Additional family members - Yes

American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.