American RadioWorks |
living-legacy

The Living Legacy

Before the civil rights movement, African Americans were largely barred from white-dominated institutions of higher education. And so black Americans, and their white supporters, founded their own schools, which came to be known as Historically Black Colleges and Universities. HBCU graduates helped launch the civil rights movement, built the black middle class, and staffed the pulpits of black churches and the halls of almost every black primary school before the 1960s. But after desegregation, some people began to ask whether HBCUs had outlived their purpose. Yet for the students who attend them, HBCUs still play a crucial -- and unique -- role. In this documentary, we hear first-person testimony from students about why they chose an HBCU; and we travel to an HBCU that’s in the process of reinventing itself wholesale.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.15

    The history of HBCUs in America

    Zach Hubert came out of slavery with an adage that he would pass on to his children, and his children's children, and their children down the line. "Get your education," he would always say to them when his family gathered together in later years. "It's the one thing they can't take away from you."
  • 08.20.15

    Lilian Spriggs: ‘When I look at HBCUs, I think of independence’

    Lilian Spriggs is an audio production major at Howard University, from Jackson, Mississippi. After graduation, she wants to work as an on-air personality at a radio station.
  • 08.20.15

    Lysious Ogolo: ‘I didn’t know what a historically black college was’

    Lysious Ogolo is an audio production major at Howard University. He's originally from Nigeria, and moved to the United States with his family in 2008 when he was 18 years old.
  • 08.20.15

    The reinvention of Paul Quinn College

    Paul Quinn College was a sorry sight when Michael Sorrell, the school's fifth president in as many years, drove onto the Dallas campus to see what he was dealing with. As Sorrell looked around campus, he had one thought. How do you save a school that everyone thinks is already dead?

American RadioWorks |
living-legacy

The Living Legacy

Before the civil rights movement, African Americans were largely barred from white-dominated institutions of higher education. And so black Americans, and their white supporters, founded their own schools, which came to be known as Historically Black Colleges and Universities. HBCU graduates helped launch the civil rights movement, built the black middle class, and staffed the pulpits of black churches and the halls of almost every black primary school before the 1960s. But after desegregation, some people began to ask whether HBCUs had outlived their purpose. Yet for the students who attend them, HBCUs still play a crucial -- and unique -- role. In this documentary, we hear first-person testimony from students about why they chose an HBCU; and we travel to an HBCU that’s in the process of reinventing itself wholesale.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.15

    The history of HBCUs in America

    Zach Hubert came out of slavery with an adage that he would pass on to his children, and his children's children, and their children down the line. "Get your education," he would always say to them when his family gathered together in later years. "It's the one thing they can't take away from you."
  • 08.20.15

    Lilian Spriggs: ‘When I look at HBCUs, I think of independence’

    Lilian Spriggs is an audio production major at Howard University, from Jackson, Mississippi. After graduation, she wants to work as an on-air personality at a radio station.
  • 08.20.15

    Lysious Ogolo: ‘I didn’t know what a historically black college was’

    Lysious Ogolo is an audio production major at Howard University. He's originally from Nigeria, and moved to the United States with his family in 2008 when he was 18 years old.
  • 08.20.15

    The reinvention of Paul Quinn College

    Paul Quinn College was a sorry sight when Michael Sorrell, the school's fifth president in as many years, drove onto the Dallas campus to see what he was dealing with. As Sorrell looked around campus, he had one thought. How do you save a school that everyone thinks is already dead?

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DAVIS, THOMAS M III, Republican Party
Virginia

Total number of trips - 12
Total cost of trips - $24,564.12

Average cost per trip - $2,047.01
Total number of days spent traveling - 38 days
Rank of representative - 264 (Out of 638)


Individual trips


Sponsor(s) - Consumer Electronics Association
Dates - January 5, 2000 - January 8, 2000 (4 days)
Location(s) - Las Vegas, NV

Purpose - consumer electronics product - education/IT speeches and panels
Notes -

Travel Cost - $423.38
Lodging Cost - $1,016.93
Meal Cost - $175.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $1,615.31

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Tech Net Massachusetts, Keane Inc
Dates - October 2, 2000 - October 2, 2000 (1 days)
Location(s) - Boston, MA

Purpose - discussion w/20 leading New England technology executives
Notes - Other expenses are thank you gift

Travel Cost - $638.51
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost - $65.58
Other Cost - $40.75
Total Cost - $744.84

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - U.S.-Mexico Chamber of Commerce
Dates - November 29, 2000 - November 29, 2000 (1 days)
Location(s) - Mexico City, Mexico

Purpose - inauguration of Mexican President -- meetings
Notes -

Travel Cost - $200.00
Lodging Cost - $200.00
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $400.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Republicans Abroad
Dates - November 2, 2001 - November 5, 2001 (4 days)
Location(s) - Costa Rica

Purpose - Fact finding
Notes - Child Carlton Davis accompanied

Travel Cost - $2,220.00
Lodging Cost - $435.00
Meal Cost - $400.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $3,055.00

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - United Hellenic American Congress
Dates - August 26, 2001 - August 30, 2001 (5 days)
Location(s) - Greece

Purpose - Fact finding, International affairs/trade
Notes - Child Carlton Davis accompanied

Travel Cost - $6,398.84
Lodging Cost - $250.32
Meal Cost - $680.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $7,329.16

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Consumer Electronics Association
Dates - January 7, 2001 - January 9, 2001 (3 days)
Location(s) - Las Vegas, NV

Purpose - Tour Consumer Electronics Show, second largest technology trade show
Notes - Child Carlton Davis accompanied

Travel Cost - $289.50
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost - $50.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $339.50

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - U.S.-Panama Business Council, Greater America Business Coalition
Dates - May 28, 2001 - May 31, 2001 (4 days)
Location(s) - Panama - El Salvador

Purpose - Fact finding, telecom issues, earthquake damage
Notes - Daughter Pamela Davis accompanied

Travel Cost - $2,000.00
Lodging Cost - $960.00
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $2,960.00

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Egypt's International Economic Forum
Dates - May 25, 2002 - May 30, 2002 (6 days)
Location(s) - Egypt

Purpose - guest speaker at economic forum
Notes - Child Carlton Davis accompanied.

Travel Cost - $6,000.00
Lodging Cost - $1,000.00
Meal Cost - $200.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $7,200.00

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - American Bankers Association
Dates - February 9, 2002 - February 10, 2002 (2 days)
Location(s) - Fort Lauderdale, FL

Purpose - address ABA legislative conference
Notes -

Travel Cost -
Lodging Cost - $450.31
Meal Cost - $120.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $570.31

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Public Governance Institute
Dates - March 7, 2005 - March 8, 2005 (2 days)
Location(s) - Queenstown, MD

Purpose - Committee on Homeland Security Retreat
Notes - DC area - Aspen Wye River Conference Center, Queenstown, MD - DC area

Travel Cost -
Lodging Cost - $350.00
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $350.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - RSA Security Inc
Dates - November 4, 2004 - November 6, 2004 (3 days)
Location(s) - Barcelona, Spain

Purpose - not specified
Notes - Washington, DC - Barcelona, Spain This information is from a House of Representatives personal financial disclosure report and does not include dollar amounts.

Travel Cost -
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost -

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Consumer Electronics Assn
Dates - January 7, 2004 - January 9, 2004 (3 days)
Location(s) - Las Vegas, NV

Purpose - not specified
Notes - Washington, DC - Las Vegas - Washington, DC This information is from a House of Representatives personal financial disclosure report and does not include dollar amounts.

Travel Cost -
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost -

Additional family members - No

American RadioWorks |
living-legacy

The Living Legacy

Before the civil rights movement, African Americans were largely barred from white-dominated institutions of higher education. And so black Americans, and their white supporters, founded their own schools, which came to be known as Historically Black Colleges and Universities. HBCU graduates helped launch the civil rights movement, built the black middle class, and staffed the pulpits of black churches and the halls of almost every black primary school before the 1960s. But after desegregation, some people began to ask whether HBCUs had outlived their purpose. Yet for the students who attend them, HBCUs still play a crucial -- and unique -- role. In this documentary, we hear first-person testimony from students about why they chose an HBCU; and we travel to an HBCU that’s in the process of reinventing itself wholesale.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.15

    The history of HBCUs in America

    Zach Hubert came out of slavery with an adage that he would pass on to his children, and his children's children, and their children down the line. "Get your education," he would always say to them when his family gathered together in later years. "It's the one thing they can't take away from you."
  • 08.20.15

    Lilian Spriggs: ‘When I look at HBCUs, I think of independence’

    Lilian Spriggs is an audio production major at Howard University, from Jackson, Mississippi. After graduation, she wants to work as an on-air personality at a radio station.
  • 08.20.15

    Lysious Ogolo: ‘I didn’t know what a historically black college was’

    Lysious Ogolo is an audio production major at Howard University. He's originally from Nigeria, and moved to the United States with his family in 2008 when he was 18 years old.
  • 08.20.15

    The reinvention of Paul Quinn College

    Paul Quinn College was a sorry sight when Michael Sorrell, the school's fifth president in as many years, drove onto the Dallas campus to see what he was dealing with. As Sorrell looked around campus, he had one thought. How do you save a school that everyone thinks is already dead?