American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

Back to all reports


CANNON, CHRISTOPHER B, Republican Party
Utah

Total number of trips - 6
Total cost of trips - $6,078.69

Average cost per trip - $1,013.12
Total number of days spent traveling - 13 days
Rank of representative - 485 (Out of 638)


Individual trips


Sponsor(s) - Western Watch Foundation
Dates - June 28, 2002 - June 29, 2002 (2 days)
Location(s) - Las Vegas, NV

Purpose - public lands conference
Notes -

Travel Cost - $2,370.50
Lodging Cost - $172.22
Meal Cost - $141.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $2,683.72

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Northwest Commission on Colleges & Universities
Dates - February 24, 2005 - February 25, 2005 (2 days)
Location(s) - Seattle, WA

Purpose - Keynote speaker for the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities' 2005 Annual Conference
Notes - SLC, UT - Seattle, WA

Travel Cost - $143.20
Lodging Cost - $137.13
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $280.33

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Center for Latin American Studies Univ of California at Berkeley
Dates - February 25, 2005 - February 28, 2005 (4 days)
Location(s) - Morelia, Mexico

Purpose - US-Mexico Futures Forum meeting. The Futures Forum is an unique network of leading political and social actors, who think about the issues facing bother countries
Notes - Seattle, WA (was speaking at a conference) - Morelia, Mexico - Salt Lake City, UT

Travel Cost - $872.67
Lodging Cost - $662.80
Meal Cost - $309.07
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $1,844.54

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - PacifiCorp
Dates - August 23, 2004 - August 23, 2004 (1 days)
Location(s) - Rock Springs, WY

Purpose - To visit and tour the Bridger Mine
Notes - Salt Lake City, UT - Rock Springs, WY - Salt Lake City, UT

Travel Cost - $667.34
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost - $57.76
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $725.10

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Center for the New West
Dates - April 3, 2005 - April 4, 2005 (2 days)
Location(s) - San Diego, CA

Purpose - Participated in Roundtable & conference
Notes - Salt Lake City, UT - San Diego, CA - Washington, DC

Travel Cost -
Lodging Cost - $225.00
Meal Cost - $100.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $325.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - National Nutritional Foods Assn
Dates - July 16, 2004 - July 17, 2004 (2 days)
Location(s) - Las Vegas, NV

Purpose - Mr. Cannon gave the keynote address at NNFA's Annual Trade show on Saturday, July 17, 2004
Notes - Including spouse

Travel Cost -
Lodging Cost - $220.00
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $220.00

Additional family members - Yes

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.