American RadioWorks |
living-legacy

The Living Legacy

Before the civil rights movement, African Americans were largely barred from white-dominated institutions of higher education. And so black Americans, and their white supporters, founded their own schools, which came to be known as Historically Black Colleges and Universities. HBCU graduates helped launch the civil rights movement, built the black middle class, and staffed the pulpits of black churches and the halls of almost every black primary school before the 1960s. But after desegregation, some people began to ask whether HBCUs had outlived their purpose. Yet for the students who attend them, HBCUs still play a crucial -- and unique -- role. In this documentary, we hear first-person testimony from students about why they chose an HBCU; and we travel to an HBCU that’s in the process of reinventing itself wholesale.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.15

    The history of HBCUs in America

    Zach Hubert came out of slavery with an adage that he would pass on to his children, and his children's children, and their children down the line. "Get your education," he would always say to them when his family gathered together in later years. "It's the one thing they can't take away from you."
  • 08.20.15

    Lilian Spriggs: ‘When I look at HBCUs, I think of independence’

    Lilian Spriggs is an audio production major at Howard University, from Jackson, Mississippi. After graduation, she wants to work as an on-air personality at a radio station.
  • 08.20.15

    Lysious Ogolo: ‘I didn’t know what a historically black college was’

    Lysious Ogolo is an audio production major at Howard University. He's originally from Nigeria, and moved to the United States with his family in 2008 when he was 18 years old.
  • 08.20.15

    The reinvention of Paul Quinn College

    Paul Quinn College was a sorry sight when Michael Sorrell, the school's fifth president in as many years, drove onto the Dallas campus to see what he was dealing with. As Sorrell looked around campus, he had one thought. How do you save a school that everyone thinks is already dead?

American RadioWorks |
living-legacy

The Living Legacy

Before the civil rights movement, African Americans were largely barred from white-dominated institutions of higher education. And so black Americans, and their white supporters, founded their own schools, which came to be known as Historically Black Colleges and Universities. HBCU graduates helped launch the civil rights movement, built the black middle class, and staffed the pulpits of black churches and the halls of almost every black primary school before the 1960s. But after desegregation, some people began to ask whether HBCUs had outlived their purpose. Yet for the students who attend them, HBCUs still play a crucial -- and unique -- role. In this documentary, we hear first-person testimony from students about why they chose an HBCU; and we travel to an HBCU that’s in the process of reinventing itself wholesale.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.15

    The history of HBCUs in America

    Zach Hubert came out of slavery with an adage that he would pass on to his children, and his children's children, and their children down the line. "Get your education," he would always say to them when his family gathered together in later years. "It's the one thing they can't take away from you."
  • 08.20.15

    Lilian Spriggs: ‘When I look at HBCUs, I think of independence’

    Lilian Spriggs is an audio production major at Howard University, from Jackson, Mississippi. After graduation, she wants to work as an on-air personality at a radio station.
  • 08.20.15

    Lysious Ogolo: ‘I didn’t know what a historically black college was’

    Lysious Ogolo is an audio production major at Howard University. He's originally from Nigeria, and moved to the United States with his family in 2008 when he was 18 years old.
  • 08.20.15

    The reinvention of Paul Quinn College

    Paul Quinn College was a sorry sight when Michael Sorrell, the school's fifth president in as many years, drove onto the Dallas campus to see what he was dealing with. As Sorrell looked around campus, he had one thought. How do you save a school that everyone thinks is already dead?

Back to all reports


BURR, RICHARD M, Republican Party
North Carolina

Total number of trips - 8
Total cost of trips - $45,871.40

Average cost per trip - $5,733.93
Total number of days spent traveling - 28 days
Rank of representative - 138 (Out of 638)


Individual trips


Sponsor(s) - Outdoor Power Equipment Distributors Association
Dates - February 24, 2000 - February 26, 2000 (3 days)
Location(s) - Amelia Island, FL

Purpose - Speak at conference on legislative process in commerce issues
Notes - Accompanied by spouse Brooke Burr

Travel Cost - $560.00
Lodging Cost - $433.26
Meal Cost - $30.70
Other Cost - $130.00
Total Cost - $1,153.96

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Universal Corporations, Tobacco Asso. Of US, Led Tobacco Exporters Asso.
Dates - May 28, 2000 - May 29, 2000 (2 days)
Location(s) - White Sulphur Springs, WV

Purpose - Address to Tobacco Asso. And Annual Meeting and Conference
Notes - Accompanied by wife Brooke Burr

Travel Cost - $1,223.92
Lodging Cost - $550.20
Meal Cost - $160.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $1,934.12

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Corning Inc.
Dates - January 5, 2000 - January 5, 2000 (1 days)
Location(s) - Wilmington, NC

Purpose - legislative briefing and tour
Notes -

Travel Cost - $818.50
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost - $10.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $828.50

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Nuclear Energy Institute
Dates - June 29, 2001 - July 6, 2001 (8 days)
Location(s) - Marseilles, France - Paris, France

Purpose - Tour French nuclear energy facilities
Notes - Spouse Brooke Burr accompanied. Transport costs include ground transportation in France.

Travel Cost - $14,577.80
Lodging Cost - $2,406.00
Meal Cost - $1,430.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $18,413.80

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Nuclear Energy Institute
Dates - June 30, 2002 - July 6, 2002 (7 days)
Location(s) - Barcelona, Spain - Seville, Spain

Purpose - fact-finding and tour of European nuclear facilities
Notes - spouse Brooke Burr -- July 5-6 at personal expense

Travel Cost - $12,417.30
Lodging Cost - $2,450.00
Meal Cost - $1,700.00
Other Cost - $340.00
Total Cost - $16,907.30

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - National Association of Broadcasters
Dates - April 6, 2002 - April 8, 2002 (3 days)
Location(s) - Las Vegas, NV

Purpose - public policy conference
Notes - Invoice for room includes two pool bar beverages and tip and a $105 'spa service'. NAB fax also mentions extra $90 transportation cost as well as airfare, not listed on form.

Travel Cost - $2,627.50
Lodging Cost - $637.22
Meal Cost - $150.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $3,414.72

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Corning Inc.
Dates - March 8, 2002 - March 10, 2002 (3 days)
Location(s) - Augusta, GA

Purpose - public policy conference
Notes -

Travel Cost - $1,226.00
Lodging Cost - $410.00
Meal Cost - $300.00
Other Cost - $533.00
Total Cost - $2,469.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Tobacco Growers Association of North Carolina, Inc.
Dates - February 7, 2003 - February 7, 2003 (1 days)
Location(s) - Raleigh, NC

Purpose - Speak to annual meeting
Notes -

Travel Cost - $750.00
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $750.00

Additional family members - No

American RadioWorks |
living-legacy

The Living Legacy

Before the civil rights movement, African Americans were largely barred from white-dominated institutions of higher education. And so black Americans, and their white supporters, founded their own schools, which came to be known as Historically Black Colleges and Universities. HBCU graduates helped launch the civil rights movement, built the black middle class, and staffed the pulpits of black churches and the halls of almost every black primary school before the 1960s. But after desegregation, some people began to ask whether HBCUs had outlived their purpose. Yet for the students who attend them, HBCUs still play a crucial -- and unique -- role. In this documentary, we hear first-person testimony from students about why they chose an HBCU; and we travel to an HBCU that’s in the process of reinventing itself wholesale.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.15

    The history of HBCUs in America

    Zach Hubert came out of slavery with an adage that he would pass on to his children, and his children's children, and their children down the line. "Get your education," he would always say to them when his family gathered together in later years. "It's the one thing they can't take away from you."
  • 08.20.15

    Lilian Spriggs: ‘When I look at HBCUs, I think of independence’

    Lilian Spriggs is an audio production major at Howard University, from Jackson, Mississippi. After graduation, she wants to work as an on-air personality at a radio station.
  • 08.20.15

    Lysious Ogolo: ‘I didn’t know what a historically black college was’

    Lysious Ogolo is an audio production major at Howard University. He's originally from Nigeria, and moved to the United States with his family in 2008 when he was 18 years old.
  • 08.20.15

    The reinvention of Paul Quinn College

    Paul Quinn College was a sorry sight when Michael Sorrell, the school's fifth president in as many years, drove onto the Dallas campus to see what he was dealing with. As Sorrell looked around campus, he had one thought. How do you save a school that everyone thinks is already dead?