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A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

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BIGGERT, JUDY, Republican Party
Illinois

Total number of trips - 10
Total cost of trips - $24,219.00

Average cost per trip - $2,421.90
Total number of days spent traveling - 28 days
Rank of representative - 267 (Out of 638)


Individual trips


Sponsor(s) - Aspen Institute
Dates - January 13, 2000 - January 16, 2000 (4 days)
Location(s) - Naples, FL

Purpose - To participate in a conference on educational reform
Notes - Accompanied by husband Rody Biggert--"stayed in the same room"

Travel Cost - $1,810.00
Lodging Cost - $1,290.00
Meal Cost - $1,170.00
Other Cost - $200.00
Total Cost - $4,470.00

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - National Association for Education of Homeless Children and Youth
Dates - October 16, 2000 - October 16, 2000 (1 days)
Location(s) - Greensboro, NC

Purpose - To address NAEHCY
Notes -

Travel Cost - $476.00
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $476.00

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Republican Main Street Partnership
Dates - April 24, 2000 - April 26, 2000 (3 days)
Location(s) - San Francisco, CA

Purpose - Fundraising for the GOP Main Street Partnership
Notes - Accompanied by husband Rody Biggert

Travel Cost - $1,462.00
Lodging Cost - $428.00
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $1,890.00

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Aspen Institute
Dates - March 9, 2001 - March 11, 2001 (3 days)
Location(s) - White Sulphur Springs, WV

Purpose - Fact finding
Notes - Spouse Rody Biggert accompanied. Meals included in lodging cost.

Travel Cost - $252.00
Lodging Cost - $950.00
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $1,202.00

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Federation of Associations of Regulatory Boards
Dates - June 10, 2001 - June 11, 2001 (2 days)
Location(s) - New Orleans, LA

Purpose - Speaking engagement
Notes -

Travel Cost - $727.00
Lodging Cost - $209.08
Meal Cost - $40.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $976.08

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Mainstreet Republican Partnership
Dates - January 17, 2002 - January 18, 2002 (2 days)
Location(s) - Los Angeles, CA

Purpose -
Notes - spouse Rody Biggert -- no purpose indicated

Travel Cost - $2,876.26
Lodging Cost - $239.00
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $3,115.26

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - National Association of Insurance Commissioners
Dates - June 10, 2002 - June 11, 2002 (2 days)
Location(s) - Chicago, IL

Purpose - speaking engagement
Notes - no location indicated

Travel Cost - $727.00
Lodging Cost - $209.08
Meal Cost - $40.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $976.08

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Aspen Institute
Dates - February 14, 2003 - February 19, 2003 (6 days)
Location(s) - Montego Bay, Jamaica

Purpose - Participate in conference on education reform
Notes - Spouse Rody Biggert accompanied. Other costs are ground transportation

Travel Cost - $3,499.40
Lodging Cost - $1,696.00
Meal Cost - $1,144.00
Other Cost - $100.00
Total Cost - $6,439.40

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - NASDAQ
Dates - April 2, 2004 - April 5, 2004 (4 days)
Location(s) - Miami, FL

Purpose - a summit to augment the relationships and concerns between business leaders and government officials
Notes - Spouse Roddy Biggert - his itinerary was Chicago to Miami to Chicago

Travel Cost - $2,263.78
Lodging Cost - $945.00
Meal Cost - $1,062.00
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $4,270.78

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - JFK School of Government Harvard Univ
Dates - October 17, 2005 - October 17, 2005 (1 days)
Location(s) - Boston, MA

Purpose - Speak as part of a lecture series that former Congressman Martin Frost is organizing at the Kennedy School. The subject was the Judiciary and the relationship w/ Congress.
Notes - Washington, DC - Boston, MA / Boston, MA - Washington, DC

Travel Cost - $403.40
Lodging Cost -
Meal Cost -
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $403.40

Additional family members - No

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.