American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball

American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball

Back to all reports


BARRETT, JAMES GRESHAM, Republican Party
South Carolina

Total number of trips - 6
Total cost of trips - $27,866.61

Average cost per trip - $4,644.44
Total number of days spent traveling - 27 days
Rank of representative - 235 (Out of 638)


Individual trips


Sponsor(s) - Nuclear Energy Institute
Dates - August 12, 2003 - August 15, 2003 (4 days)
Location(s) - Las Vegas, NV

Purpose - To tour the Department of Energy's nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain
Notes - Spouse Natalie Barrett accompanied. Other costs include helicopter to Yucca and shuttle fees

Travel Cost - $2,016.00
Lodging Cost - $259.42
Meal Cost - $686.00
Other Cost - $812.67
Total Cost - $3,774.09

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Heritage Foundation
Dates - January 21, 2004 - January 23, 2004 (3 days)
Location(s) - Cambridge, MD

Purpose - Conservative Members Retreat
Notes - audio visual equipment used by sponsor

Travel Cost - $63.75
Lodging Cost - $300.00
Meal Cost - $267.17
Other Cost - $39.13
Total Cost - $670.05

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - GENO
Dates - January 16, 2004 - January 20, 2004 (5 days)
Location(s) - Oslo, Norway

Purpose - To speak to Norwegian officials about a prospect that would ensure security of America's food source (from cattle)
Notes - Spouse - Natalie F. Barrett

Travel Cost - $8,681.91
Lodging Cost - $1,087.74
Meal Cost - $362.12
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $10,131.77

Additional family members - Yes


Sponsor(s) - Heritage Foundation
Dates - February 3, 2005 - February 4, 2005 (2 days)
Location(s) - Baltimore, MD

Purpose - Discuss agenda for 109th Congress and to get legislative briefings on key issues
Notes - Capitol Hill - Baltimore

Travel Cost - $75.60
Lodging Cost - $212.63
Meal Cost - $113.89
Other Cost - $39.41
Total Cost - $441.53

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Areva Inc
Dates - November 27, 2004 - December 3, 2004 (7 days)
Location(s) - Paris, France

Purpose - To tour AREVA's nuclear facilities in France that have expertise and operate in every sector of the nuclear power industry, including MOX facilities, nuclear fuel cycle, reactors, instrumentation, nuclear measurement systems and engineering
Notes - Greenville, SC - Paris, France - Greenville, NC

Travel Cost - $1,886.83
Lodging Cost - $1,089.24
Meal Cost - $655.79
Other Cost -
Total Cost - $3,631.86

Additional family members - No


Sponsor(s) - Ripon Society
Dates - November 7, 2004 - November 12, 2004 (6 days)
Location(s) - Frankfurt, Germany - Budapest, Hungary

Purpose - To participate in panel discussions for the Trans Atlantic Conference regarding a knowledge-based, global economy
Notes - Dulles Int'l Airport - Frankfurt - Budapest / Budapest - Munich - Dulles

Travel Cost - $6,970.33
Lodging Cost - $1,208.60
Meal Cost - $989.71
Other Cost - $48.67
Total Cost - $9,217.31

Additional family members - Yes

American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball