American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

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American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

    Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.


Choose the first letter of the last name of the representative

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Choose the name of the representative.

CALLAHAN, HERBERT L
CALVERT, KEN MR
CAMP, DAVID LEE
CAMPBELL, BEN NIGHTHORSE
CANADY, CHARLES T
CANNON, CHRISTOPHER B
CANTOR, ERIC
CANTWELL, MARIA
CAPITO, SHELLEY MOORE
CAPPS, LOIS G
CAPUANO, MICHAEL EVERETT
CARDIN, BENJAMIN L
CARDOZA, DENNIS
CARNAHAN, JEAN
CARNAHAN, JOHN RUSSELL
CARPER, THOMAS R
CARSON, BRAD
CARSON, JULIA
CARTER, JOHN
CASE, EDWARD E
CASTLE, MICHAEL N
CHABOT, STEVE
CHAFEE, LINCOLN D
CHAMBLISS, SAXBY
CHAMBLISS, SAXBY
CHANDLER, BEN
CHOCOLA, J CHRISTOPHER
CHRISTENSEN, DONNA M
CLAY, WILLIAM L SR
CLAY, WILLIAM LACY JR
CLAYTON, EVA
CLEAVER, EMANUEL II
CLELAND, JOSEPH MAXWELL
CLEMENT, BOB
CLINTON, HILLARY RODHAM
CLYBURN, JAMES E
COBLE, JOHN HOWARD
COBURN, THOMAS A
COCHRAN, THAD
COLE, TOM
COLEMAN, NORM
COLLINS, MICHAEL E
COLLINS, SUSAN M
COMBEST, LARRY
CONAWAY, K MICHAEL
CONRAD, KENT
CONYERS, JOHN JR
COOKSEY, JOHN CHARLES
COOPER, JAMES H S
CORNYN, JOHN
COSTA, JIM
COSTELLO, JERRY F
COVERDELL, PAUL
COX, CHRISTOPHER
COYNE, WILLIAM J
CRAIG, LARRY E
CRAMER, ROBERT EDWARD "BUD" JR
CRANE, PHILIP M
CRAPO, MICHAEL D
CRENSHAW, ANDER M
CROWLEY, JOSEPH
CUBIN, BARBARA L
CULBERSON, JOHN
CUMMINGS, ELIJAH E
CUNNINGHAM, RANDY DUKE

American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

    Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.