American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.


Adoption stories


Me and my two adopted sons, April 2003, four months after bringing them home. They saw the ocean and played on the beach for the first time.

Margaret Schwartz
Falls Church, VA

Birth Country: United States
Decade of adoption: 2000 or later

I adopted two boys from Ukraine in December 2003 with the use of an agency. The process was frustrating and scary, but the hardest part was learning how to be a new mother. I kept a journal throughout the process and decided to publish it so others would understand the joys and challenges of adoption, especially for singles. The book is titled The Pumpkin Patch: A Single Woman's International Adoption Journey. I will never forget the faces of the children I left behind, and my passion in life is now to raise the awareness of the plight of these children.



Back to Adoption Stories


American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.