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Photo: Dierk Schaefer

Making it stick

Why do we remember some things, and forget others? That's what author Peter Brown and psychologists Henry Roediger and Mark McDaniel set out to answer in their new book Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning.

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American RadioWorks |
Photo: Dierk Schaefer

Making it stick

Why do we remember some things, and forget others? That's what author Peter Brown and psychologists Henry Roediger and Mark McDaniel set out to answer in their new book Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning.

Recent Posts



Adoption stories


Sara Schlueter Weidner
Prairie Village, KS

Birth Country: South Korea
Decade of adoption: 1970s

I am the youngest of six adopted children, two from the United States and the rest from South Korea. My parents saw a documentary at church on Korean war orphans and decided that their home was big enough to adopt another child. I was number three. My parents began the process of adopting a Korean orphan through Holt International and received notice that there was a baby boy for them. One month before he was to come to the United States, he suddenly died from a fever. My parents were devastated. A few weeks later, Holt contacted them and stated that they had a baby girl for them. At the age of five months, I came to the United States via a 747 to Chicago, Illinois. Back then, whole planes were chartered for adoptees. My parents nervously waited, and then I was delivered to them. My parents are courageous and loving people.



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American RadioWorks |
Photo: Dierk Schaefer

Making it stick

Why do we remember some things, and forget others? That's what author Peter Brown and psychologists Henry Roediger and Mark McDaniel set out to answer in their new book Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning.

Recent Posts