American RadioWorks |
Photo: FEMA Photo Library.

The Lost Children of Katrina

In the year following Hurricane Katrina, 30 percent of displaced children were either not enrolled in school or not attending regularly. Today, Louisiana has the nation’s highest rate of young adults who are neither in school nor working. And researchers are starting to ask: could the widespread gaps in schooling after Katrina be the reason?

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American RadioWorks |
Photo: FEMA Photo Library.

The Lost Children of Katrina

In the year following Hurricane Katrina, 30 percent of displaced children were either not enrolled in school or not attending regularly. Today, Louisiana has the nation’s highest rate of young adults who are neither in school nor working. And researchers are starting to ask: could the widespread gaps in schooling after Katrina be the reason?

Recent Posts

  • 04.08.15

    Saving a Women’s College from Closure

    Last month the board of Sweet Briar College announced that the school will shut its doors at the end of this term, due to financial difficulties. The announcement was made abruptly, sending the campus community into a state of shock... and then activism.
  • 04.01.15

    The Future of College

    Kevin Carey's book "The End of College" is stirring up debate in higher ed circles. This week, a response to the book by a critic.
  • 03.25.15

    The End of College or the University of Everywhere

    When education policy wonk Kevin Carey looks into the future, he sees the end of traditional colleges and universities and he says that's a good thing.
  • 03.18.15

    UnRetirement

    Today older Americans are heading back to school in record numbers. Many have already started a career, but want to gain knowledge or skills that can make them more competitive in the workplace. Colleges and universities are grappling with the needs of a changing population of students.


Adoption stories


Mike Carey
Golden Valley, MN

Birth Country: South Korea
Decade of adoption: 1990s

There are days still, after ten years, when I think of the miracle of adoption: the perfect match of parents and child across cultures and language and race. There are days I completely forget our son is Korean because he completes us and our lives are so normal. He's just a kid, a great, fun-loving, joyful, happy kid who loves hockey, baseball, soccer and archery. He has lots of friends and seems well adjusted. Still, there are times when we are with his Korean buddies or at a Korean restaurant or at a camp and we see another spark, a deeper joy, a peace and calm that is not always there.

We went to South Korea this year and he had the chance to see the vibrant, high-tech, modern, exciting country of his birth. Our hope is that he finds comfort, joy and peace in both worlds. We know the teenage years can be hard. They are hard for lots of kids and lots of parents. Adoption is only one challenge he'll face in life. Our hope is to foster self-esteem and pride in the fact that he is a good, talented, interesting person with a wide range of interests. We hope he is interested in his culture and many other interesting things in a big interesting world; the same thing most birth parents hope for their children.

Being a Korean adoptee makes him that much more interesting, but it doesn't define him or his life. His education, his values, his family, his interests, his talents, his foibles and mistakes all define him. I believe that over time, we'll look back on cross-cultural adoptions as one of the ways we have broken down barriers and become a truly multi-racial society. Our son has broadened the horizons and perspectives of our extended family, his friends' families, his school and sports teams. We know the concerns, the controversy and the challenges of international adoption. Thankfully, we also know the joy, pride and love. Kind of sounds like parenting to me.



Back to Adoption Stories


American RadioWorks |
Photo: FEMA Photo Library.

The Lost Children of Katrina

In the year following Hurricane Katrina, 30 percent of displaced children were either not enrolled in school or not attending regularly. Today, Louisiana has the nation’s highest rate of young adults who are neither in school nor working. And researchers are starting to ask: could the widespread gaps in schooling after Katrina be the reason?

Recent Posts

  • 04.08.15

    Saving a Women’s College from Closure

    Last month the board of Sweet Briar College announced that the school will shut its doors at the end of this term, due to financial difficulties. The announcement was made abruptly, sending the campus community into a state of shock... and then activism.
  • 04.01.15

    The Future of College

    Kevin Carey's book "The End of College" is stirring up debate in higher ed circles. This week, a response to the book by a critic.
  • 03.25.15

    The End of College or the University of Everywhere

    When education policy wonk Kevin Carey looks into the future, he sees the end of traditional colleges and universities and he says that's a good thing.
  • 03.18.15

    UnRetirement

    Today older Americans are heading back to school in record numbers. Many have already started a career, but want to gain knowledge or skills that can make them more competitive in the workplace. Colleges and universities are grappling with the needs of a changing population of students.