American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.12.14

    Tracking and vocational ed

    Jeannie Oakes, who has studied tracking for decades, says vocational ed and "tracking" are connected, and that sorting students by race and class is still a problem.
  • 08.04.14

    Reinventing college for a new kind of student

    Long-predicted demographic changes mean a new kind of student is figuring out where to go to college, and how to pay for it.
  • 07.29.14

    Is school funding fair?

    A new report looks at why some schools have a lot of money to spend per pupil, while others don't, and what to do about it.

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.12.14

    Tracking and vocational ed

    Jeannie Oakes, who has studied tracking for decades, says vocational ed and "tracking" are connected, and that sorting students by race and class is still a problem.
  • 08.04.14

    Reinventing college for a new kind of student

    Long-predicted demographic changes mean a new kind of student is figuring out where to go to college, and how to pay for it.
  • 07.29.14

    Is school funding fair?

    A new report looks at why some schools have a lot of money to spend per pupil, while others don't, and what to do about it.


Adoption stories


Leah Kessel
Minneapolis, MN

Birth Country: South Korea
Decade of adoption: 1970s

My biological brother and I were adopted by a Minnesotan family (parents and their biological son) when I was four and he was two years old. They went through the Children's Home Society here in St. Paul. Even though the three of us were raised together in the same household, we are very different from each other. My younger brother and I have different feelings about our adoption, and I think that my older brother's experiences are just as important to acknowledge.

Several years ago, my family took a trip to South Korea, and I was able to meet my birth mother and her family. It was an incredible experience.

I am most grateful to have been adopted with my younger brother, that we were able to stay together. I am also very happy to have been brought together with an older brother whom I love just as much as I do my younger brother. And I believe we were all meant to be with one another.

At the time that my parents adopted us, I don't believe it was common for parents to go abroad to pick up the children themselves. I vaguely remember being on the plane, sitting next to people and playing with them. I recently came upon a note from the adults who had been playing with us on the plane, and it was a wonderful experience. It felt like just another piece of the experience (puzzle) had been handed to me.



Back to Adoption Stories


American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.12.14

    Tracking and vocational ed

    Jeannie Oakes, who has studied tracking for decades, says vocational ed and "tracking" are connected, and that sorting students by race and class is still a problem.
  • 08.04.14

    Reinventing college for a new kind of student

    Long-predicted demographic changes mean a new kind of student is figuring out where to go to college, and how to pay for it.
  • 07.29.14

    Is school funding fair?

    A new report looks at why some schools have a lot of money to spend per pupil, while others don't, and what to do about it.