American RadioWorks |
The campus of the University of Chicago. Kevin Carey says most students of the future won't be going to traditional college campuses. Photo: Wikipedia.

The End of College or the University of Everywhere

When education policy wonk Kevin Carey looks into the future, he sees the end of traditional colleges and universities and he says that's a good thing.

Recent Posts

  • 03.18.15

    UnRetirement

    Today older Americans are heading back to school in record numbers. Many have already started a career, but want to gain knowledge or skills that can make them more competitive in the workplace. Colleges and universities are grappling with the needs of a changing population of students.
  • 03.11.15

    The Test

    In her new book,“The Test: Why Our Schools are Obsessed with Standardized Testing–But You Don’t Have to Be,” NPR Education Blogger Anya Kamenetz examines the role testing plays in American public education.
  • 03.04.15

    An Administrator Responds to Adjunct Protests

    Last week, we talked about growing dissent among adjunct college instructors who claim they’re not getting compensated fairly for the work they do. This week we’ll hear from someone who has dealt with this issue from the administration side.
  • 02.26.15

    Adjunct voices

    Ahead of National Adjunct Walkout Day on February 25th, American RadioWorks asked adjunct professors around the country how things are going for them. The short answer? Not well.

American RadioWorks |
The campus of the University of Chicago. Kevin Carey says most students of the future won't be going to traditional college campuses. Photo: Wikipedia.

The End of College or the University of Everywhere

When education policy wonk Kevin Carey looks into the future, he sees the end of traditional colleges and universities and he says that's a good thing.

Recent Posts

  • 03.18.15

    UnRetirement

    Today older Americans are heading back to school in record numbers. Many have already started a career, but want to gain knowledge or skills that can make them more competitive in the workplace. Colleges and universities are grappling with the needs of a changing population of students.
  • 03.11.15

    The Test

    In her new book,“The Test: Why Our Schools are Obsessed with Standardized Testing–But You Don’t Have to Be,” NPR Education Blogger Anya Kamenetz examines the role testing plays in American public education.
  • 03.04.15

    An Administrator Responds to Adjunct Protests

    Last week, we talked about growing dissent among adjunct college instructors who claim they’re not getting compensated fairly for the work they do. This week we’ll hear from someone who has dealt with this issue from the administration side.
  • 02.26.15

    Adjunct voices

    Ahead of National Adjunct Walkout Day on February 25th, American RadioWorks asked adjunct professors around the country how things are going for them. The short answer? Not well.


Adoption stories


Leah Kessel
Minneapolis, MN

Birth Country: South Korea
Decade of adoption: 1970s

My biological brother and I were adopted by a Minnesotan family (parents and their biological son) when I was four and he was two years old. They went through the Children's Home Society here in St. Paul. Even though the three of us were raised together in the same household, we are very different from each other. My younger brother and I have different feelings about our adoption, and I think that my older brother's experiences are just as important to acknowledge.

Several years ago, my family took a trip to South Korea, and I was able to meet my birth mother and her family. It was an incredible experience.

I am most grateful to have been adopted with my younger brother, that we were able to stay together. I am also very happy to have been brought together with an older brother whom I love just as much as I do my younger brother. And I believe we were all meant to be with one another.

At the time that my parents adopted us, I don't believe it was common for parents to go abroad to pick up the children themselves. I vaguely remember being on the plane, sitting next to people and playing with them. I recently came upon a note from the adults who had been playing with us on the plane, and it was a wonderful experience. It felt like just another piece of the experience (puzzle) had been handed to me.



Back to Adoption Stories


American RadioWorks |
The campus of the University of Chicago. Kevin Carey says most students of the future won't be going to traditional college campuses. Photo: Wikipedia.

The End of College or the University of Everywhere

When education policy wonk Kevin Carey looks into the future, he sees the end of traditional colleges and universities and he says that's a good thing.

Recent Posts

  • 03.18.15

    UnRetirement

    Today older Americans are heading back to school in record numbers. Many have already started a career, but want to gain knowledge or skills that can make them more competitive in the workplace. Colleges and universities are grappling with the needs of a changing population of students.
  • 03.11.15

    The Test

    In her new book,“The Test: Why Our Schools are Obsessed with Standardized Testing–But You Don’t Have to Be,” NPR Education Blogger Anya Kamenetz examines the role testing plays in American public education.
  • 03.04.15

    An Administrator Responds to Adjunct Protests

    Last week, we talked about growing dissent among adjunct college instructors who claim they’re not getting compensated fairly for the work they do. This week we’ll hear from someone who has dealt with this issue from the administration side.
  • 02.26.15

    Adjunct voices

    Ahead of National Adjunct Walkout Day on February 25th, American RadioWorks asked adjunct professors around the country how things are going for them. The short answer? Not well.