American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball

American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball


Adoption stories


Barbara Kavan
LeCenter, MN

Birth Country: Romania
Decade of adoption: 1990s

My story is about the adoption of two boys from Romania and the joy that they have given to me and my family. From a historical perspective, Romania had been under a communist dictator up until December of 1989. He had wanted to build up his army, so therefore no birth control was allowed. However families couldn't afford to keep the children and they were then put in state institutions where they could be taken care of. The orphanages were very crowded and extremely under-staffed.

The adoption of Stefan occurred in September of 1991. For 33 months he had lived in an orphanage in Timosara, Romania. Stefan was about to be put in the home for "irrecuperables" because they diagnosed him mentally retarded and his eyes were crossed. I could see after watching a video of him that he was far from retarded, but had severe developmental delays. After many years of both private therapy and assistance from the public school system settings, Stefan has made wonderful progress and now is appropriately diagnosed as having high-functioning autism. He is a sophomore in high school and is taking geometry and biology as part of his course-work (not bad for a kid that would have never had a chance in a Romanian institution.)

My second son, Eugen, was adopted in the fall of 1995. He had spent seven years living in an orphanage in Turna Severin, Romania. After spending 12 days in Romania and seeing the horrific conditions, I could only begin to understand the abuse that Eugen had gone through.

He has shared with us the beatings that he took, the limited food that he was allowed and the unclean conditions he lived in. Bringing him back to America was a very trying experience. He was like a little wild animal trying to fit into a home with no reference point as to what that meant. He had to learn the language, attend school for the first time and follow the boundaries that we expect when living in a home.

School continues to be very difficult for Eugen, as he is diagnosed with ADHD and he is in special classes for reading and math. He has a wonderful spirit however, and is very happy to be in our home. Eugen is a true survivor and his heart will carry him a long way. Though the boys are not genetically linked, they share a common bond that can never be taken away from them. Their names were the only possessions that they took from Romania with them. They have taught me so much over the years. I am often told by friends and extended family that the boys were so lucky to be adopted. My response to that is that I am the lucky one!



Back to Adoption Stories


American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball