American RadioWorks |
Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

Featured Documentary: King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. More than four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that’s not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

Recent Posts

  • 02.12.16

    Making Sure Learning Sticks

    If you want to really learn something before a big test, put your books down. Research shows that the traditional method of “cramming” for an exam by reading the same thing over and over again, doesn’t work. (Rerun from Oct. 2014)
  • 02.04.16

    When School Vouchers Are Not a Leg Up

    School voucher programs are controversial because they allow students to use public funds to pay for private school. A new paper is one of the first to show a school voucher program actually lowering student test scores.
  • 01.28.16

    Learning Financial Literacy

    Most teenagers are not learning about personal finance in school, according to an annual survey on financial literacy. Our guest this week says that needs to change.
  • 01.21.16

    Questioning Inequalities in Higher Ed

    College was once considered the path of upward mobility in this country, and for many people, it still is. But research shows that the higher education system can actually work against poor and minority students, because they often end up at colleges with few resources and low graduation rates.

American RadioWorks |
Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

Featured Documentary: King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. More than four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that’s not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

Recent Posts

  • 02.12.16

    Making Sure Learning Sticks

    If you want to really learn something before a big test, put your books down. Research shows that the traditional method of “cramming” for an exam by reading the same thing over and over again, doesn’t work. (Rerun from Oct. 2014)
  • 02.04.16

    When School Vouchers Are Not a Leg Up

    School voucher programs are controversial because they allow students to use public funds to pay for private school. A new paper is one of the first to show a school voucher program actually lowering student test scores.
  • 01.28.16

    Learning Financial Literacy

    Most teenagers are not learning about personal finance in school, according to an annual survey on financial literacy. Our guest this week says that needs to change.
  • 01.21.16

    Questioning Inequalities in Higher Ed

    College was once considered the path of upward mobility in this country, and for many people, it still is. But research shows that the higher education system can actually work against poor and minority students, because they often end up at colleges with few resources and low graduation rates.


Adoption stories


Patrick Rounds
Edina, MN

Birth Country: South Korea
Decade of adoption: 1980s

Jong Hong Kim, four months, now Nicholas Raymond Rounds, age 23, arrived via Northwest Orient Airlines one cold January night in 1983 with several other Korean infants through the services of the Children's Home Society.

The moment was huge for my wife and I and our two biological daughters, ages ten and eight. Many members of my immediate family and neighbors were there, plus a small crowd that gathered in the gate area probably thinking a rock band was arriving. This event was far more exciting than that.

He was our new son, an exceptional bundle of joy and a gift from above. Tears were in abundance. Adoption was the only method to add to our family as we had decided not to have any additional children after daughter number two for purely financial reasons.

Nicholas (Nick) is all boy and participated successfully in baseball, hockey and golf, his real passion. Now married and living in Florida, he hopes to make golf his profession as he struggles through mini-tour events looking to get noticed. My only struggle other than his poor driving habits during high school was how noticable and subtle racism can be in our daily lives. From the emotion packed contact sports to job interviews, I have heard the racial slurs and witnessed the "looks" associated with minority status.

But we remain blessed beyond belief as we experience more goodness than hate as each year passes. We now have a four-year-old Korean grandson adopted by my number two daughter, with special needs due to a chromosome imbalance. He amazes us every day as he struggles to catch up to his contemporaries. Minnesota is a wonderful state for his special needs and services are many and varied.



Back to Adoption Stories


American RadioWorks |
Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

Featured Documentary: King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. More than four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that’s not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

Recent Posts

  • 02.12.16

    Making Sure Learning Sticks

    If you want to really learn something before a big test, put your books down. Research shows that the traditional method of “cramming” for an exam by reading the same thing over and over again, doesn’t work. (Rerun from Oct. 2014)
  • 02.04.16

    When School Vouchers Are Not a Leg Up

    School voucher programs are controversial because they allow students to use public funds to pay for private school. A new paper is one of the first to show a school voucher program actually lowering student test scores.
  • 01.28.16

    Learning Financial Literacy

    Most teenagers are not learning about personal finance in school, according to an annual survey on financial literacy. Our guest this week says that needs to change.
  • 01.21.16

    Questioning Inequalities in Higher Ed

    College was once considered the path of upward mobility in this country, and for many people, it still is. But research shows that the higher education system can actually work against poor and minority students, because they often end up at colleges with few resources and low graduation rates.