American RadioWorks |
Image: Harvard First Generation Student Union Facebook Page.

The First Gen Movement

Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

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  • 04.15.15

    The Lost Children of Katrina

    In the year following Hurricane Katrina, 30 percent of displaced children were either not enrolled in school or not attending regularly. Today, Louisiana has the nation’s highest rate of young adults who are neither in school nor working. And researchers are starting to ask: could the widespread gaps in schooling after Katrina be the reason?
  • 04.08.15

    Saving a Women’s College from Closure

    Last month the board of Sweet Briar College announced that the school will shut its doors at the end of this term, due to financial difficulties. The announcement was made abruptly, sending the campus community into a state of shock... and then activism.
  • 04.01.15

    The Future of College

    Kevin Carey's book "The End of College" is stirring up debate in higher ed circles. This week, a response to the book by a critic.
  • 03.25.15

    The End of College or the University of Everywhere

    When education policy wonk Kevin Carey looks into the future, he sees the end of traditional colleges and universities and he says that's a good thing.

American RadioWorks |
Image: Harvard First Generation Student Union Facebook Page.

The First Gen Movement

Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

Recent Posts

  • 04.15.15

    The Lost Children of Katrina

    In the year following Hurricane Katrina, 30 percent of displaced children were either not enrolled in school or not attending regularly. Today, Louisiana has the nation’s highest rate of young adults who are neither in school nor working. And researchers are starting to ask: could the widespread gaps in schooling after Katrina be the reason?
  • 04.08.15

    Saving a Women’s College from Closure

    Last month the board of Sweet Briar College announced that the school will shut its doors at the end of this term, due to financial difficulties. The announcement was made abruptly, sending the campus community into a state of shock... and then activism.
  • 04.01.15

    The Future of College

    Kevin Carey's book "The End of College" is stirring up debate in higher ed circles. This week, a response to the book by a critic.
  • 03.25.15

    The End of College or the University of Everywhere

    When education policy wonk Kevin Carey looks into the future, he sees the end of traditional colleges and universities and he says that's a good thing.


Adoption stories


Beverly Fish
Ypsilanti, MI

Birth Country: South Korea
Decade of adoption: 1990s

Being an adopted parent has changed my life in a truly wonderful way. I became a member of a very special group of parents who shared their experiences of home studies, visa papers and the overwhelming, at times, amounts of paperwork needed to be completed for our adoption caseworkers. Instead of labor pains, we share the agony of waiting day by day for the phone to ring, telling us we have become new parents. Whether it is your first adoption or a second or third, there is always the suspenseful wait. I remember getting the call that I had received my referral from Korea for a baby boy. He immediately became my son, Morgan.

From that moment, I was a mother. The hard part for adoptive parents is often the fact that all you have is a photo. That photo becomes your lifeline. I carried it with me at all times, showing it to everyone. I think I even showed it to strangers at the supermarket! Fortunately, I had become a member of a support group of adoptive parents who helped me through the wait. I shopped for baby things, had a baby shower and fixed up Morgan's room. Every night I sat in his room holding his picture, in my rocking chair, dreaming of the day when I would actually be holding my little boy.

December 16 will always be a special day in my heart as Morgan's arrival day. Most adoptive families celebrate "gotcha' day" or "airplane day" as the first day that their child became part of their "forever family." For me, it is the day to reflect on the long struggle to jump through all the hurdles that it took to finally become a mother. As I watch the video of the first time I saw my son in his orphanage, I always feel tears well up in my eyes. I will always remember holding him close to me and how he put his little arms around my neck and nuzzled my shoulder.

Two years later, on March 29, I repeated my experience as I held my daughter in my arms at Metro Airport in Detroit while friends and family gathered around to see Morgan's new baby sister. That night, once all the visitors had left, Morgan ran upstairs and brought down his special "blankie" and wrapped it around his little sister.

Today, I am an avid supporter of adoption. As a member of our Korean Culture Camp and our Families for Children support group, my life has been enriched through all the wonderful people I have met who share the one thing that bonds us: a love for our children and their Korean heritage. I am always happy to share my stories with anyone who is thinking about becoming an adoptive parent. It will change your life forever.



Back to Adoption Stories


American RadioWorks |
Image: Harvard First Generation Student Union Facebook Page.

The First Gen Movement

Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

Recent Posts

  • 04.15.15

    The Lost Children of Katrina

    In the year following Hurricane Katrina, 30 percent of displaced children were either not enrolled in school or not attending regularly. Today, Louisiana has the nation’s highest rate of young adults who are neither in school nor working. And researchers are starting to ask: could the widespread gaps in schooling after Katrina be the reason?
  • 04.08.15

    Saving a Women’s College from Closure

    Last month the board of Sweet Briar College announced that the school will shut its doors at the end of this term, due to financial difficulties. The announcement was made abruptly, sending the campus community into a state of shock... and then activism.
  • 04.01.15

    The Future of College

    Kevin Carey's book "The End of College" is stirring up debate in higher ed circles. This week, a response to the book by a critic.
  • 03.25.15

    The End of College or the University of Everywhere

    When education policy wonk Kevin Carey looks into the future, he sees the end of traditional colleges and universities and he says that's a good thing.