American RadioWorks |

An Administrator Responds to Adjunct Protests

Last week, we talked about growing dissent among adjunct college instructors who claim they’re not getting compensated fairly for the work they do. This week we’ll hear from someone who has dealt with this issue from the administration side.

Recent Posts

  • 02.26.15

    Adjunct voices

    Ahead of National Adjunct Walkout Day on February 25th, American RadioWorks asked adjunct professors around the country how things are going for them. The short answer? Not well.
  • 02.25.15

    Adjuncts Unite

    What would higher education look like without adjunct professors? That’s what a grass-roots group of academics is trying to prove by holding a National Adjunct Walk-out Day on February 25.
  • 02.19.15

    To Test or Not to Test?

    Sometime in the next few weeks, Senate Republicans and Democrats will vote to reauthorize The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. On the podcast this week, we talk to two education advocates who differ on how and when we should test our kids.
  • 02.11.15

    Looking back: An Imperfect Revolution

    In June 2007, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down school desegregation plans that look at students’ race. This week on the podcast, we’re featuring our 2007 documentary, “An Imperfect Revolution: Voices from the Desegregation Era,"

American RadioWorks |

An Administrator Responds to Adjunct Protests

Last week, we talked about growing dissent among adjunct college instructors who claim they’re not getting compensated fairly for the work they do. This week we’ll hear from someone who has dealt with this issue from the administration side.

Recent Posts

  • 02.26.15

    Adjunct voices

    Ahead of National Adjunct Walkout Day on February 25th, American RadioWorks asked adjunct professors around the country how things are going for them. The short answer? Not well.
  • 02.25.15

    Adjuncts Unite

    What would higher education look like without adjunct professors? That’s what a grass-roots group of academics is trying to prove by holding a National Adjunct Walk-out Day on February 25.
  • 02.19.15

    To Test or Not to Test?

    Sometime in the next few weeks, Senate Republicans and Democrats will vote to reauthorize The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. On the podcast this week, we talk to two education advocates who differ on how and when we should test our kids.
  • 02.11.15

    Looking back: An Imperfect Revolution

    In June 2007, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down school desegregation plans that look at students’ race. This week on the podcast, we’re featuring our 2007 documentary, “An Imperfect Revolution: Voices from the Desegregation Era,"


Adoption stories


Cortney Natkow
Reston, VA

Birth Country: South Korea
Decade of adoption: 1970s

I was adopted from Korea 26 years ago (three years after my sister, who also came from Korea, although we are not blood sisters). I have lived in the U.S. since and have never been back to Korea.

My parents tried to give us our Korean culture by food, books and camps, but growing up, I really was American and had no Asian friends. At times I would forget I was Korean until I looked into the mirror.

I did think about my birth parents from time to time, but never had a big urge to find them. I felt like my family was here with me and what was in the past was in the past.

Now I am almost 27 years old and have been married to my husband for three years. We are in the process of adopting a baby of our own by choice. We are going back to Korea for our baby boy and are awaiting our call to travel to pick him up. I never really thought of any other way but adoption to start my family. Luckily, my husband was supportive and wanted the same thing.

The hospital that I came from in Korea (Eastern Social Welfare) will be the same place that my baby will come from. The same Dr. Kims are running the facility and I will be able to meet them when I go over. I will be able to thank them for the work they do and tell them the full circle that I have come in my life.

When we are over in Korea I will have the opportunity to meet my birth family. I found them a couple months ago and figure that if I was going to Korea I'd try to find them. Fortunately, it was pretty easy and they wanted to meet me as well. I found out that they are married now and they have other children, which means I have full blood siblings in Korea. I also found out that my given Korean name was wrong, and my birthday has been wrong for the past 26 years as well (by only 9 days). They are very apologetic about giving me up for adoption and I am thankful they did. I hope they will be able to see what an amazing thing it is for the other side to accept a baby.

My adoptive parents and my sister will join us on this journey to Korea, because when I came over I was escorted to America. Now they will be able to experience the country as well as meet the foster mother of their grandchild.

Adoption is quite a journey for everyone. It is sad for one and exciting for another. It is a loss for one mother and a blessing for another.



Back to Adoption Stories


American RadioWorks |

An Administrator Responds to Adjunct Protests

Last week, we talked about growing dissent among adjunct college instructors who claim they’re not getting compensated fairly for the work they do. This week we’ll hear from someone who has dealt with this issue from the administration side.

Recent Posts

  • 02.26.15

    Adjunct voices

    Ahead of National Adjunct Walkout Day on February 25th, American RadioWorks asked adjunct professors around the country how things are going for them. The short answer? Not well.
  • 02.25.15

    Adjuncts Unite

    What would higher education look like without adjunct professors? That’s what a grass-roots group of academics is trying to prove by holding a National Adjunct Walk-out Day on February 25.
  • 02.19.15

    To Test or Not to Test?

    Sometime in the next few weeks, Senate Republicans and Democrats will vote to reauthorize The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. On the podcast this week, we talk to two education advocates who differ on how and when we should test our kids.
  • 02.11.15

    Looking back: An Imperfect Revolution

    In June 2007, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down school desegregation plans that look at students’ race. This week on the podcast, we’re featuring our 2007 documentary, “An Imperfect Revolution: Voices from the Desegregation Era,"