American RadioWorks |
Divestment protest at University of Wisconsin-Madison, April 4, 2014. Photo: Light Brigade on Flickr.

Divestment on Campus

Across the world, college students are urging their institutions to “divest” from fossil fuels. This week we ask: is the divestment movement working?

Recent Posts

  • 05.20.15

    Can how you move change how you think?

    Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?
  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.

American RadioWorks |
Divestment protest at University of Wisconsin-Madison, April 4, 2014. Photo: Light Brigade on Flickr.

Divestment on Campus

Across the world, college students are urging their institutions to “divest” from fossil fuels. This week we ask: is the divestment movement working?

Recent Posts

  • 05.20.15

    Can how you move change how you think?

    Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?
  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.


Adoption stories


Our daughter when we first met her in 2001. Her birth certicate stated she was two months old, but her records show that she was really four months old.

Nancy Ferguson
Washington Crossing, PA

Birth Country: Vietnam
Decade of adoption: 2000 or later

This is the story I wrote for her naming ceremony at our Unitarian Church, where we are only one of many lesbian and gay couples to have adopted.

For Our Daughter,

September 10, 2001, we saw pictures of our precious daughter for the first time. In the pictures, she was about one month old. She had wispy hair with a tiny round face and the biggest, blackest eyes. She was (and still is) the most beautiful baby we have ever seen.

While we were waiting for our referral, we wondered how we would react when we saw pictures of our child for the first time. Cry? Scream? We didn't do either. We just couldn't take our eyes off her. We couldn't get over how very beautiful she was! We just wanted to kiss those little cheeks!

Today she is a very (and I mean very) active ten-month-old! She now has a very round face, and of course, she still has those beautiful black eyes and the longest eye lashes! She amazes us every day, and we are still in awe of her, even after almost seven months of being together. She is learning words and studies and watches every move her mamma and mommy make. She is the light of our lives, and our favorite hobby these days is just watching her!

We can't remember what it was like without her, pretty boring we're sure! When we wake up in the morning, we can already hear her happily babbling in her crib.

Being Chloe's mom is the best, most exciting and most rewarding job we have ever had! (Definitely the hardest and sometimes the most challenging as well!) Her hugs, her patting us on the back, her fishy kisses and hearing her call, "Ma-ma" when she wakes up in the morning are the best paychecks we've ever received!

We are grateful for the support of our friends, family and church.

We are especially grateful to Chloe's birth mother for giving us the greatest gift we have ever received. When we look into her eyes or kiss her cheek, we know that her choice has enabled us to grow and allowed us to love in ways that we never knew existed. It took such guts and courage to give the gift that she has given. We hope that she knows on some level that we will raise her daughter to be proud of her and her heritage.

No one else, except maybe other adoptive parents, can know the intensity and meaning of that moment when governments recognize and state what you already know, the child is now a part of your family, your life, your present, future, and past.

Chloe Anne Dieu Thanh Tiet Ferguson has changed our lives forever, not just because Chloe became a part of our family but because we became a part of Chloe's family. It has changed how we see ourselves and our lives. No decision will ever be simple again.



Back to Adoption Stories


American RadioWorks |
Divestment protest at University of Wisconsin-Madison, April 4, 2014. Photo: Light Brigade on Flickr.

Divestment on Campus

Across the world, college students are urging their institutions to “divest” from fossil fuels. This week we ask: is the divestment movement working?

Recent Posts

  • 05.20.15

    Can how you move change how you think?

    Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?
  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.