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Video games: New literacy for a complex world

Author James Paul Gee says video games are problems to solve that come with their own tools. He says they're like "an external mind," and teachers should use them in classrooms.

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American RadioWorks |
Flickr / kurafire

Video games: New literacy for a complex world

Author James Paul Gee says video games are problems to solve that come with their own tools. He says they're like "an external mind," and teachers should use them in classrooms.

Recent Posts



Adoption stories


Family portrait taken two months after Theodore's arrival.

Michelle Lee
Aloha, OR

Birth Country: South Korea
Decade of adoption: 2000 or later

My husband and I are both Korean. We were born in Korea in the late 60s and immigrated to the United States with our parents in the early 70s. We adopted a baby boy from Korea this year, and he's been home with us seven months now. Because we are U.S. citizens and adopted internationally, this is an international adoption. But also because we are both native Koreans, our son will have to be "told" one day that he was adopted. We also have a biological daughter who is 15 months older than our adopted son. I converse regularly with white adoptive parents at our Holt playgroups. My perspective is different from theirs in that I don't ever have to deal with "intrusive" or "grocery store" questions from strangers. I find myself being the token Korean culture liaison to these families who adopted Korean children.



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American RadioWorks |
Flickr / kurafire

Video games: New literacy for a complex world

Author James Paul Gee says video games are problems to solve that come with their own tools. He says they're like "an external mind," and teachers should use them in classrooms.

Recent Posts