American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.12.14

    Tracking and vocational ed

    Jeannie Oakes, who has studied tracking for decades, says vocational ed and "tracking" are connected, and that sorting students by race and class is still a problem.
  • 08.04.14

    Reinventing college for a new kind of student

    Long-predicted demographic changes mean a new kind of student is figuring out where to go to college, and how to pay for it.
  • 07.29.14

    Is school funding fair?

    A new report looks at why some schools have a lot of money to spend per pupil, while others don't, and what to do about it.

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.12.14

    Tracking and vocational ed

    Jeannie Oakes, who has studied tracking for decades, says vocational ed and "tracking" are connected, and that sorting students by race and class is still a problem.
  • 08.04.14

    Reinventing college for a new kind of student

    Long-predicted demographic changes mean a new kind of student is figuring out where to go to college, and how to pay for it.
  • 07.29.14

    Is school funding fair?

    A new report looks at why some schools have a lot of money to spend per pupil, while others don't, and what to do about it.


Adoption stories


Family portrait taken two months after Theodore's arrival.

Michelle Lee
Aloha, OR

Birth Country: South Korea
Decade of adoption: 2000 or later

My husband and I are both Korean. We were born in Korea in the late 60s and immigrated to the United States with our parents in the early 70s. We adopted a baby boy from Korea this year, and he's been home with us seven months now. Because we are U.S. citizens and adopted internationally, this is an international adoption. But also because we are both native Koreans, our son will have to be "told" one day that he was adopted. We also have a biological daughter who is 15 months older than our adopted son. I converse regularly with white adoptive parents at our Holt playgroups. My perspective is different from theirs in that I don't ever have to deal with "intrusive" or "grocery store" questions from strangers. I find myself being the token Korean culture liaison to these families who adopted Korean children.



Back to Adoption Stories


American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.12.14

    Tracking and vocational ed

    Jeannie Oakes, who has studied tracking for decades, says vocational ed and "tracking" are connected, and that sorting students by race and class is still a problem.
  • 08.04.14

    Reinventing college for a new kind of student

    Long-predicted demographic changes mean a new kind of student is figuring out where to go to college, and how to pay for it.
  • 07.29.14

    Is school funding fair?

    A new report looks at why some schools have a lot of money to spend per pupil, while others don't, and what to do about it.